Crowds celebrate Obama victory at White House

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Updated 07 November 2012

Crowds celebrate Obama victory at White House

WASHINGTON: Chanting “Four more years!” and “USA, USA!,” a crowd of several thousand well-wishers danced and waved flags outside the White House late Tuesday after Barack Obama was swept back into office.
Crowds braved the chilly autumn weather as they rushed toward the president’s official residence, whooping and crying out “Obama, Obama!,” and giving high-fives to complete strangers.
Union activist Nicole Arow, 28, said she was “thrilled and relieved” to learn about the Democratic incumbent’s victory over Republican rival Mitt Romney, adding: “Joy. That’s what I feel.”
Downtown Washington, usually deserted at midnight on a weekday, was teeming with cars, drivers honking their horns in celebration and waving US flags out the windows.
Obama became only the second Democrat to win a second four-year White House term since World War II.
Those who arrived at the White House shortly after US television networks called the race for Obama appeared to be mainly college students, but the party quickly grew to include middle-aged people and parents with young children.
Hope Cordova, 46, was one of the few who remembered to bring a campaign sign — in her case, a plastic blue-and-white Obama-Biden 2012 yard sign.
“It takes more than four years to turn the country around. We want to give him four more years to complete his job,” said Cordova, 46, a California real estate agent who was visiting a Washington-based friend.
Overcome by enthusiasm, a rowdy group borrowed her sign to wave outside the White House gates. The group jumped in unison as friends took pictures and amateur video with the iconic building in the background. TV reporters filmed the scene, shining bright lights on the group that added to their delirium.
“I’m incredibly excited,” gushed Justin Pinn, a 22-year-old government student at Georgetown University. “I feel that my hope is renewed and I’m ready to fight the good fight. It’s a great day to be an American!” he said.
The outpouring of enthusiasm was reminiscent of the spontaneous celebrations that broke out in Washington immediately after Obama won the 2008 presidential election over Republican Senator John McCain.
Crowds had also gathered outside the White House to celebrate in May 2011 when Obama announced the death of Osama Bin Laden.


US to pay over $1bn for 100m doses of J&J’s potential COVID-19 vaccine

Updated 05 August 2020

US to pay over $1bn for 100m doses of J&J’s potential COVID-19 vaccine

  • The latest contract equates to roughly $10 per vaccine dose produced by J&J
  • This is J&J’s first deal to supply its investigational vaccine to a country

WASHINGTON: The United States government will pay Johnson & Johnson over $1 billion for 100 million doses of its potential coronavirus vaccine, its latest such arrangement as the race to tame the pandemic intensifies, the drugmaker said on Wednesday.
It said it would deliver the vaccine to the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) on a not-for-profit basis to be used after approval or emergency use authorization by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
J&J has already received $1 billion in funding from the US government — BARDA agreed in March to provide that money for the company to build manufacturing capacity for more than 1 billion doses of the experimental vaccine.
The latest contract equates to roughly $10 per vaccine dose produced by J&J. Including the first $1 billion deal with the USgovernment, the price would be slightly higher than the $19.50 per dose that the United States is paying for the vaccine being developed by Pfizer Inc. and German biotech BioNTech SE.
The US government may also purchase an additional 200 million doses under a subsequent agreement. J&J did not disclose that deal’s value.
J&J plans to study a one- or two-dose regimen of the vaccine in parallel later this year. A single-shot regimen could allow more people to be vaccinated with the same number of doses and would sidestep issues around getting people to come back for their second dose.
This is J&J’s first deal to supply its investigational vaccine to a country. Talks are underway with the European Union, but no deal has yet been reached.
J&J’s investigational vaccine is currently being tested on healthy volunteers in the United States and Belgium in an early-stage study.
There are currently no approved vaccines for COVID-19. More than 20 are in clinical trials.