PIF investments in stock market reach SR459bn

Updated 14 September 2014

PIF investments in stock market reach SR459bn

The market capitalization of shares owned and invested by the Pubic Investments Fund (PIF) in Saudi stock market grew by 26.5 percent to SR459 billion by the end of August (2014) compared to SR363 billion by the end of 2013, according to a financial report.
PIF’s shares in the Saudi stock market yielded profits of SR96.1 billion in the period mentioned above, the report carried by Al-Eqtisadiah daily, said.
According to the report, the PIF is considered the biggest holder of shares in the Saudi stock market where it owns nearly 20.3 percent of shares whose market capitalization is worth SR2.26 trillion by the end of August.
The major part of PIF’s investments in the Saudi stock market is invested in 11 sectors representing some 18 companies, the report said.
The petrochemical sector captured the lion’s share of profits achieved by PIF in the stock market at 47 percent valued at SR45.3 billion, followed by telecom sector at 32 percent at SR30.8 billion.
Saudi Basic Industrial Corporation (SABIC) and Saudi Telecom Company (STC) were the two major drivers of the PIF’s profits in the petrochemical and telecom sectors, respectively, in the past 8 months, the report said.
The banking sector was the third largest contributor to PIF’s profits in the stock market at 11 percent valued at SR10.9 billion, followed by the industrial investments at 5 percent (SR4.9 billion), transport at 1.4 percent (SR1.4 billion), and real estate development at 1.1 percent (SR1 billion), the report said.
Share of five sectors to the PIF’s profits was less than 1 percent for each as follows: Cement (SR901 million), agriculture (SR587 million), tourism and hotels (SR 131 million), construction (SR75.5 million), and energy (SR49 million).
At the company levels, SABIC and STC were the top contributors to the PIF’s profits at 47 percent (SR45.3 billion) and 32 percent (SR30.8 billion), respectively, followed by Riyad Bank at 5.9 percent (SR5.7 billion), Saudi Arabian Mining Company (Maaden) at 5.1 percent (SR4.7 billion), Samba Financial Group at 3.9 percent (SR3.7 billion), Alinma Bank at 1.6 percent (SR1.5 billion), the National Shipping Company of Saudi Arabia (Bahri) at 1.2 percent (SR1.1 billion), Saudi Real Estate (Aqaria) at 1.1 percent (SR1 billion). Share of the remaining 10 companies to the PIF’s profits was less than 1 percent (less than SR1 billion) for each, the report said.


Time is running out for Brexit trade deal, UK minister says

Updated 18 min 26 sec ago

Time is running out for Brexit trade deal, UK minister says

  • Both sides are demanding concessions from the other on fishing, state aid and how to resolve any future disputes
  • George Eustice: We really are now running out of time

LONDON: Britain and the European Union are running out of time to clinch a Brexit trade deal but if good progress is made this week then the talks could be extended, Environment Secretary George Eustice said on Monday.
With just over four weeks left until the United Kingdom finally exits the EU’s orbit on Dec. 31, both sides are demanding concessions from the other on fishing, state aid and how to resolve any future disputes.
“We really are now running out of time, this is the crucial week, we need to get a breakthrough,” Eustice told Sky.
“I really do think we are now in to the final week or 10 days, of course if great progress were made this week and you’re nearly there it’s always possible to extend those negotiations,” he said.
Britain formally left the EU on Jan. 31 but has been in a transition period since then under which rules on trade, travel and business remain unchanged. From the start of 2021 it will be treated by Brussels as a third country.
Talks between EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier and British chief negotiator David Frost continued through Sunday. British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said it was a very significant week for Brexit.
“David Frost had made clear that we’re continuing the negotiations because we still think there is a prospect that we can get an agreement and while there is we should persevere with those,” Eustice said.