Saudi nonoil exports down 19% to SR15.7 billion in March

Updated 16 May 2015

Saudi nonoil exports down 19% to SR15.7 billion in March

Saudi nonoil exports dropped by 19.4 percent in March, 2015, to reach SR15.7 billion compared to the figures of the same period last year, according to a report released by the Central Department of Statistics and Information (CDSI).
Meanwhile, Saudi imports increased by 2.8 percent to SR55.6 billion compared to the figures of the same period last year, the CDSI report, quoted by local media, said.
Plastic products topped the Kingdom’s list of exports in March and registered 32.14 percent of nonoil exports valued at more than SR5 billion, the report said.
Petrochemical products ranked second in nonoil exports valued at more than SR4 billion, or 26.21 percent, followed by ordinary metals and products by 9.15 percent, or SR1.4 billion, of the total value of exports.
Equipment, machinery and electrical utensils captured the highest value of Saudi imports in March (2015) at SR14.9 billion, or 26.86 percent of the total value of imports, followed by transport materials at the value of SR9.5 billion, or 17.13 percent, and ordinary metals and their products at SR5.4 billion, or 9.83 percent, the report added.
The UAE topped the list of major importers of Saudi nonoil products by 10.68 percent of the total value of exports in March, followed by China at 10.05 percent and India at 7.32 percent, the report said.
In the same month, China remained the biggest exporter to the Kingdom and captured 13.99 percent of the total Saudi imports, followed by the United States at 12.22 percent and Germany at 6.90 percent, the report said.


Uber wins challenge against London operating license refusal

Updated 28 September 2020

Uber wins challenge against London operating license refusal

  • Uber was allowed to continue operating while the appeal was underway

LONDON: Uber can keep operating in London after the ride-hailing company won a court appeal on Monday against the refusal by transit regulators to renew its license.
The US company had challenged Transport for London’s decision in late 2019 not to renew its private hire vehicle (PHV) operating license over safety concerns involving imposter drivers.
“Despite their historical failings, I find them, now, to be a fit and proper person to hold a London PHV operator’s license,” Deputy Chief Magistrate Tanweek Ikram wrote in his decision.
Uber was allowed to continue operating while the appeal was underway. The decision came after a four-day hearing at Westminster Magistrates’ Court earlier this month.
Transport for London had decided two years ago to reject Uber’s application for a new license, citing several breaches that placed passengers and their safety at risk. The regulator noted, among other things, that unauthorized drivers were able to carry out thousands of rides by uploading their photos to other driver accounts.