Local partner condition may be scrapped to bolster FDI

Updated 07 February 2016

Local partner condition may be scrapped to bolster FDI

JEDDAH: New steps being taken to increase the flow of foreign investments into Saudi Arabia this year have raised the expectations of the business community.
A triple sectorial committee, including Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA), Ministry of Commerce and Industry, and Ministry of Labor, is seriously reviewing factors that hinder investment in the Saudi market, Asharq Al-Awsat reported Saturday.
Quoting sources, the report said that the study is aimed to facilitate global companies’ investment in the Saudi market and to present them with incentives.
The daily also stated that the committee’s review would shift the current situation to a new standpoint, which eliminates all obstacles slowing down global investment.
The condition to have a local partner in a foreign investment project for it to be granted access to the Kingdom’s direct market has reduced the scale of foreign investment in Saudi Arabia.
The condition for the need for a local partner is likely to be removed when the committee concludes its studies, the report indicated.
James Reeve, deputy chief economist and assistant general manager, Samba Financial Group, said: “Saudi Arabia needs to attract FDI to help stem losses of international reserves.”
He told Arab News: “The main obstacle for foreign investors is the lack of clarity on bankruptcy laws. That, and the hiring and firing of nationals.”
Reeve said: “Retail is the main growth sector of the next few years. It is already in pretty good shape. One might expect some consolidation (i.e. fewer smaller independent outlets) and some bigger players.”
Said Al-Shaikh, group chief economist of the National Commercial Bank, commented: “Probably one of the things making it difficult for foreign investors is the issue of legal enforcement.”
The lengthy process of resolving commercial disputes is a major concern, he said. “Within the legal system there are until now no special courts for commercial disputes. They go to general courts.”
Al-Shaikh said: “The lengthy process in obtaining licenses is another hindrance.”
Fawaz Alfawaz, a Riyadh-based economic consultant, told Arab News: “It really depends on the type of investments we the Kingdom aspires to. The existing state of the economy makes energy intensive and distribution more attractive because of the cost structure in the Saudi economy. But as the Kingdom strives to modernize its economy the types of foreign investment we need becomes radically different.”
Alfawaz added: “SAGIA can help with streamlining the bureaucracy, the information, the rules and regulations but the heavy lifting is really on the total eco-system starting with public sector, private sector to find the right partners and the productivity of the Saudi labor market.”


Getting more women into leadership positions top priority: CEO

This June 23, 2018 photo, shows a general view of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (AP)
Updated 18 January 2020

Getting more women into leadership positions top priority: CEO

  • Saudi Arabia is focusing on the Business 20 (B20), making this one of the key engagement groups. Women in Business will be Saudi Arabia’s signature topic

RIYADH: The boss of one of Saudi Arabia’s biggest banks says that getting more women into leadership positions is a top priority.
Samba CEO Rania Nashar chairs the action council for Women in Business created by the Business Twenty (B20), which is the official G20 dialogue with the business community. It represents the global business community across all G20 member states and all economic sectors.
She said the council was set up to boost women’s particpation not only in business but also in global leadership positions.
During the launch of the B20 in Saudi Arabia this week, Nashar highlighted the under-representation of women in the economy.
“There is a gap of 27 percent between male and female workers; 75 percent of males are part of the labor force while only 48 percent of females are working,” she said.
She said it was important not to just talk about women as workers but as business owners.

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Saudi Arabia will host the 15th G20 Summit in Riyadh on Nov. 21-22, 2020.

“That’s why entrepreneurship is very fundamental to our task force,” she said.  “The majority of the finance development programs have incentives for giving loans to females; however, despite the fact that many large borrowers are females, the amount of loans granted to them is far below what is granted to males,” she added.
Nashar said that two-thirds of female business founders feel that they were not taken seriously by investors when they pitch for investments. They also feel that they are treated differently from their male counterparts.
Saudi Arabia will host the 15th G20 Summit in Riyadh on Nov. 21-22, 2020. The Kingdom is focusing on the Business 20 (B20), making this one of the key engagement groups. Women in Business will be Saudi Arabia’s signature topic.