Prince Alwaleed, Murdoch discuss strategic alliance

Prince Alwaleed, Murdoch discuss strategic alliance
Updated 05 February 2013

Prince Alwaleed, Murdoch discuss strategic alliance

Prince Alwaleed, Murdoch discuss strategic alliance

Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, chairman of Kingdom Holding Company (KHC) and Rotana Group, met with James Murdoch, deputy chief operating officer, chairman and CEO of News Corporation International at The Savoy Hotel, during the prince's visit to London.
The meeting was also attended by Fahad Alsukait, CEO of Rotana Group and CEO of Alarab Channel that is owned by Prince Alwaleed, and Nahla Nasser Alanbar, private executive assistant to the prince, and top executives of News Corp.
Prince Alwaleed and James Murdoch discussed various issues related to Rotana, News Corp. and KHC. Also during the meeting, they discussed their strategic alliance and reaffirmed their support for Rotana. Prince Alwaleed has 7 percent (voting shares) through KHC in News Corp. and KHC, which is 95 percent owned by Prince Alwaleed, is the second largest shareholder in News Corp. after the Murdoch family. Moreover, News Corp. owns a 19 percent stake in Rotana.


Boris Johnson: UK government looking at conduct of Arcadia directors

Updated 39 min 3 sec ago

Boris Johnson: UK government looking at conduct of Arcadia directors

Boris Johnson: UK government looking at conduct of Arcadia directors
  • ‘We will be doing everything we can to restore the high streets of this country’
LONDON: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Wednesday the conduct of directors of the collapsed fashion group Arcadia would be examined.
“The secretary of state for business, enterprise and skills (Alok Sharma) has written to the Insolvency Service to look at the conduct of the Arcadia directors,” Johnson told parliament.
Arcadia, owned by Philip Green, entered administration on Monday, threatening 13,000 jobs.
“We will be doing everything we can to restore the high streets of this country,” Johnson added.
Sharma said he had asked the regulator to review a report from Arcadia’s administrators as soon as they received it.
“If you decide that there are grounds for an investigation, I would ask that it looks not only at the conduct of directors immediately prior to and at insolvency, but also at whether any action by directors caused detriment to creditors or to the pension schemes,” he said in the letter.