Joint GCC naval force planned to protect waters

Updated 17 October 2014

Joint GCC naval force planned to protect waters

KUWAIT CITY: Arab states in the Gulf plan to launch a joint naval force, a top Kuwaiti defense official said on Wednesday, in a bid to protect waters shared with neighboring Iran.
The new force is expected to be formed in the “coming months,” Maj. Gen. Ahmad Yussef Al-Mulla was quoted as saying by the official KUNA news agency.
The Gulf Cooperation Council states — Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the UAE — formed the Peninsula Shield force in 1982 as a 5,000-strong army.
Al-Mulla said military officials from the six nations were still working out details for the naval force, which will be organized in a similar way to the joint ground forces.
The size of the force will depend on the “level of external threats for Gulf marine security,” he said.
The six states share thousands of kilometers of shoreline along the Red Sea and the Arabian Sea — bodies of water also patrolled by Iran’s powerful navy. They have a population of 50 million, about half of them foreigners.


Yemeni government, STC discuss coalition under Riyadh Agreement

Updated 21 min 39 sec ago

Yemeni government, STC discuss coalition under Riyadh Agreement

  • Prime Minister Maeen Abdulmalik Saeed met on Thursday with STC representatives in Riyadh
  • The discussions between the two sides come under the Riyadh Agreement signed in November last year

DUBAI: The Saudi-backed government of Yemen met with the Southern Transitional Council (STC) to discuss the political components to form the new government as part of a power-sharing deal. 
Prime Minister Maeen Abdulmalik Saeed met on Thursday with STC representatives in Riyadh to outline reforms to unite national ranks between the anti-Houthi coalition, according to state news agency Saba New.
Both sides discussed the priorities of the new government to face existing challenges in the political, military, security, service and economic sectors. Sustainable reforms and addressing corruption, were also on the agenda. 
The discussions between the two sides come under the Riyadh Agreement signed in November last year. 
The new government will look to face current economic challenges in the war-torn country with the aim to stop the deterioration of the national currency exchange rate, as well as the humanitarian situation.

Meanwhile, President Abdrabbu Mansour Hadi left Saudi Arabia and headed to the United States for medical treatment

The head of the country’s internationally-recognised government, who has lived in exile in Riyadh since the Iranian-aligned Houthi group captured the Yemeni capital Sanaa in 2015, has been treated for a heart condition since 2011.