Consumer protection law under Shoura study

Consumer protection law under Shoura study
Updated 12 November 2014

Consumer protection law under Shoura study

Consumer protection law under Shoura study

The Shoura Council will soon have a discussion on a draft bill on consumer protection that would see a body set up to monitor prices and deal with unethical practices.
The bill provides for the consumer protection commission to report directly to Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah, and would have financial and administrative independence.
Arab News reported on Monday that the law proposes penalties of a maximum of two years in prison and fines between SR5,000 and SR50,000.
Meanwhile, Shoura members discussed Tuesday a bill to protect public property. Fahad Al-Hamad, assistant chairman of the council, said the meeting chaired by the council’s Deputy Chairman Muhammad Al-Jeffery in Riyadh, was briefed on a report of the administration and human resources committee.Members who participated in the discussion pointed out the limitations of the bill, which consists of 26 articles and five chapters. They said it only brings public servants under its jurisdiction and not other citizens and expatriates who are in a position to damage or waste public property. It also excludes companies in which the government has an investment of under 25 percent.
Council members also want the bill to have penalties for anyone that releases information that leads to loss of public money. Further discussion on the bill is expected to take place.
Meanwhile, in a discussion on the annual report of the Customs Department, members proposed the setting up of a committee to deal with the congestion of trucks on the King Fahd Causeway.
Members also proposed that there should be steps taken to ease the export of some commodities to member countries of the Arab Free Trade Zone by exempting Saudi goods from customs duty.