King Salman center for Yemeni aid welcomed

King Salman center for Yemeni aid welcomed
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King Salman center for Yemeni aid welcomed
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Updated 17 May 2015

King Salman center for Yemeni aid welcomed

King Salman center for Yemeni aid welcomed

Saudis and Yemenis have welcomed the government’s move to establish a center named after Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman in Riyadh to coordinate relief and humanitarian activities in Yemen.
The opening of the center by the king on Wednesday follows the launch of Operation Restoring Hope and his directive to correct the legal status of Yemeni workers, including giving them extendable six-month visit visas and allowing them to work.
“This is a wonderful gesture from the humanitarian king,” said one Saudi blogger.
He highlighted the $274 million emergency aid ordered by King Salman to alleviate the sufferings of Yemenis affected by the Houthi attacks.
King Salman’s order to provide jobs to undocumented Yemenis after correcting their status has been widely welcomed. Yemenis staying illegally in the Kingdom by overstaying their Umrah and visit visas will benefit from the royal gesture.
Illegal Yemenis are currently trying to obtain valid passports from the Yemeni embassy and consulate in the Kingdom to benefit from the royal amnesty.
Brig. Mohammed Al-Shahri, director of the Passport Department in Jazan, said his department has deployed more staff members to correct the status of Yemeni workers and answer their queries regarding the amnesty.
He said Yemenis must obtain passports or travel documents from the representatives of their legitimate government to benefit from the royal gesture.
Yemeni Consulate officials operating at Adnan Hotel in Jazan received a large number of their nationals who wanted to correct their legal status and get travel documents.
Ali bin Mohammed Al-Anasi, assistant consul general of Yemen, commended King Salman. “This royal gesture is a continuation of the Kingdom’s ongoing efforts to protect the Yemeni people from the atrocities of the Houthi militia and its allies,” Al-Anasi told the Saudi Press Agency.
Abdu bin Mohammed Al-Shoukhi, head of the Yemeni community in Jazan, also praised King Salman. “Coordination is under way to open more branches of the Yemeni Consulate to issue travel documents,” Al-Shoukhi said. New offices will start functioning in Samtah and Rayan, he said.
He underscored King Salman’s support for Yemenis during the present crisis caused by the Iranian-backed Houthis. He urged all Yemenis to cooperate with the Saudi authorities and correct their legal status as quickly as possible.
“King Salman’s order to allow illegal Yemenis to correct their status and work in the Kingdom reflects his nobility and generosity,” said Abdu Aqel Mohammed, a Yemeni worker. “The king’s gesture raises the hope of Yemenis,” he added.
Ahmed bin Ali Shaawan, another Yemeni, said the king’s gesture would allow Yemeni workers to make a decent living in the Kingdom. Omar Haj, another Yemeni, spoke highly of Saudi Arabia’s aid to Arab and underdeveloped countries over the years.
According to one report, Saudi Arabia has given more than SR250 billion in foreign aid to various countries over the past 24 years. Of this amount, SR85 billion went to nine Arab countries — Yemen, Egypt, Jordan, Bahrain, Oman, Palestine, Morocco, Sudan and Djibouti. Egypt received the lion’s share of Saudi aid for Arabs at 29 percent followed by Yemen at 17 percent.