Djibouti cuts ties with Iran; Jordan summons Tehran envoy

Updated 07 January 2016

Djibouti cuts ties with Iran; Jordan summons Tehran envoy

RIYADH: Djibouti cut its diplomatic relations with Iran on Wednesday in solidarity with Saudi Arabia, Al-Arabiya news channel said, quoting an official source.
Djibouti thus became the fourth country after Saudi Arabia, Sudan and Bahrain to cut ties with Iran after the attack on Saudi missions in Tehran and Mashhad by apparently organized mobs.
The United Arab Emirates (UAE) partially downgraded its relations with Iran, while Kuwait has recalled its envoy from Tehran.
after the attack on Saudi missions in Iran by an apparently organized mob. Egypt has also expressed its solidarity with Saudi Arabia, condemning Iran’s repeated interference in regional affairs.
In Amman, state news agency Petra said Jordan summoned Iran’s ambassador to condemn the attacks and “Iranian interference” in Arab affairs.
Oman, meanwhile, denounced the attacks on the Saudi diplomatic posts in Iran as “unacceptable”, while Turkey said the execution of Shiite radical Nimr Al-Nimr that sparked the Iranian attacks was a domestic issue.
The Jordanian government stressed its condemnation “of the Iranian interference in the internal affairs of Arab states,” the Petra news agency said. It also rejected Iranian statements it said represented “interference in internal Saudi affairs.”
The Iranian ambassador was told to relay the Jordanian position to his government immediately.
In Doha, Oman’s Foreign Affairs Ministry also slammed Iranian interference, even though it has not announced any downgrading of ties ties with Tehran.
The sultanate expressed “great sorrow” over the attacks and emphasized “the importance of establishing new norms (to) prohibit any form of interference in the internal affairs of other states in order to achieve stability and peace.”
In Ankara, Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said on Wednesday executions in Saudi Arabia were a domestic issue as he denounced those who were making a big issue out of it.
In a speech to local officials, Erdogan said those who remained silent about the deaths of people in Syria’s civil war were now causing uproar over the execution of one person in Saudi Arabia. His remarks were in apparent reference to Iran, which, together with Russia, had been an ardent backer of the Bashad Assad regime.


Iran says black boxes of downed Ukraine plane of ‘no help’

In this file photo taken on January 8, 2020 rescue teams work amidst debris after a Ukrainian plane carrying 176 passengers crashed near Imam Khomeini airport in the Iranian capital Tehran early in the morning on January 8, killing everyone on board. (AFP)
Updated 7 min 11 sec ago

Iran says black boxes of downed Ukraine plane of ‘no help’

  • Ottawa has demanded for several months that Iran, which does not have the technical means to decode the black boxes, send the items abroad so that their content can be analyzed

TEHRAN: The black boxes of a Ukrainian plane mistakenly downed near Tehran airport will be of “no help” in any investigation, but Iran is ready to transfer them abroad, state media said Saturday.
Flight 752, an Ukraine International Airlines jetliner, was struck by a missile and crashed shortly after taking off from the Tehran airport on January 8.
“Even though the investigation is nearly complete and the contents of the boxes will be of no help for the investigation, we are ready to give them to a third country or to a (foreign) company,” Mohsen Baharvand, deputy foreign affairs minister, was quoted as saying by the official IRNA news agency.
In the immediate aftermath of the crash, Iranian civilian authorities insisted it was likely caused by a technical malfunction, vehemently denying claims the plane was shot down.
But in the early hours of January 11, the Iranian military admitted that the plane was shot down due to “human error,” killing 176 people, mainly Iranians and Canadians, including many dual nationals.
Ottawa has demanded for several months that Iran, which does not have the technical means to decode the black boxes, send the items abroad so that their content can be analyzed.
After Tehran said in March it was ready to transfer the black boxes to France or Ukraine, Canada’s foreign minister Francois-Philippe Champagne guardedly welcomed a “step in the right direction,” while noting that he would judge Iranian authorities on “their actions and not just their words.”
In his interview with IRNA, Baharvand implied that Iran had certain conditions for transferring the black boxes abroad, but did not elaborate.