OIC flays ‘terror backer, sectarian Iran’

OIC flays ‘terror backer, sectarian Iran’
1 / 4
OIC flays ‘terror backer, sectarian Iran’
2 / 4
OIC flays ‘terror backer, sectarian Iran’
3 / 4
OIC flays ‘terror backer, sectarian Iran’
4 / 4
Updated 23 January 2016

OIC flays ‘terror backer, sectarian Iran’

OIC flays ‘terror backer, sectarian Iran’

JEDDAH: Several members of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) launched a blistering attack on Iran at an extraordinary meeting here Thursday of its Council of Foreign Ministers, accusing it of fomenting sectarianism and supporting terrorist groups in the region.
A number of ministers blasted Iran for storming the Kingdom’s diplomatic missions in Tehran and Mashhad and for interfering in the internal affairs of Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Yemen and Syria. The ministers also took Iran to task for supporting terrorism.
Foreign ministers and representatives of more than 45 of the pan-Islamic organization’s 56 members attended the closed-door meeting, which went on for four hours.
The extraordinary meeting was convened at the request of Saudi Arabia, with the heated deliberations indicating Iran’s near total isolation in the Arab and Muslim world.
In the final communiqué issued at the end of the meeting, the ministers said the aggression against the Saudi missions constituted a flagrant violation of international law, in reference to the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations of 1961.
“These aggressions contravene the OIC’s charter, which call for promoting trust and fostering friendly relations, mutual respect and cooperation among member states, and abstaining from interfering in the internal affairs of member states,” said the communiqué.
Without mentioning Nimr Al-Nimr, who was executed in Saudi Arabia recently, the OIC rejected and condemned Iran’s inflammatory statements on the enforcement of judicial decisions against perpetrators of terrorist crimes in the Kingdom.
“These statements are a blatant interference in the internal affairs of Saudi Arabia and a contravention of the UN Charter, the OIC Charter and of all international covenants which call for non-interference in the internal affairs of the member states,” said the OIC foreign ministers.
The OIC denounced Iran’s interference in the internal affairs of Bahrain, Yemen and Syria and its support for terrorism. It also condemned the sectarian and denominational agenda because of its “destructive ... repercussions for the security and stability of the member states.”
The OIC called on all member states and the international community to take serious and effective steps to prevent the recurrence of such aggressions on diplomatic and consular missions in Iran.
The ministers also strongly condemned the abduction of Qataris in Iraq, describing it as a heinous act of terror. They called on the Iraqi government to assume its international legal responsibilities to guarantee the safety and release of the abducted Qataris.
Speaking at the meeting, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel Al-Jubeir said Iran seeks to spread sedition, unrest and chaos as well as incite sectarian strife in the region. “Iran is the main reason for instability and wars in our region,” he said.
“Iran is a member state which does not respect the charter of our organization and its principles. Iran proudly declares that it controls four Arab capitals and has 200,000 trained fighters in a number of countries in the region. This is clear evidence of Iran’s provocative policies toward its neighbors and the Arab region,” Al-Jubeir said.
“The Iranian attack was a part of ongoing attacks on the diplomatic missions in Iran for the last 35 years,” he said. “It is the responsibility of the host government to take measures, not to issue statements aimed more at deflecting blame than offering practical protection to diplomatic missions,” said Al-Jubeir.
Saudi Arabia severed all diplomatic and commercial ties with Iran after the attacks. Other Gulf countries took varying measures to downgrade ties with Iran, and had condemned the country’s actions.
OIC Secretary-General Iyad Madani said that the strained relations among some of the OIC’s member states were deepening the fractures in the Islamic body politic and promoting political and sectarian polarization.
Warning against exacerbating these tensions, he said the attacks against Saudi Arabia’s diplomatic missions had breached diplomatic norms. “This situation turns us away from effectively addressing the true challenges that threaten the future of our member states and their peoples,” he said.
Iran’s Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araqchi struck a conciliatory tone as he stepped into the meeting. “We do not want confrontation or escalation,” he said. “It is our wish that this meeting will help us reduce tensions.”
During the meeting, many ministers, including Al-Jubeir, dismissed Araqchi’s statement as empty talk. According to them, Iran remains responsible for all the unrest and conflict in the region.
The meeting was chaired by Sheikh Sabah Al-Khaled Al-Hamad Al-Sabah, Kuwait’s first deputy prime minister and foreign minister. Kuwait is the president of the current session of the OIC’s Council of Foreign Ministers.
Among the attendees were foreign ministers from various member states, including Turkey’s Mevlut Cavusoglu, Qatar’s Khalid bin Mohammed Attiyah, Oman’s Yusuf bin Alawi bin Abdullah, Indonesia's Retno Marsudi and the UAE's Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al-Nahyan.
Other members present included Bahrain’s Sheikh Khalid Al-Khalifa, Pakistan’s Sartaj Aziz, Malaysia’s Anifah Aman, Morocco’s Mbarka Bouaida, Bangladesh’s Abul Hassan Mahmood Ali and Dunya Maumoon of Maldives.


Saudi Arabia condemns attacks by Israeli forces at Al-Aqsa

Saudi Arabia condemns attacks by Israeli forces at Al-Aqsa
Updated 11 May 2021

Saudi Arabia condemns attacks by Israeli forces at Al-Aqsa

Saudi Arabia condemns attacks by Israeli forces at Al-Aqsa

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has condemned attacks carried out by Israeli forces at Al-Aqsa, a foreign ministry statement said early Tuesday.
The actions have caused concern in the Muslim world as the site is one of the most religious in Islam. 
The Saudi ministry of foreign affairs strongly condemns the attacks carried out by the occupation forces at Al-Aqsa mosque transgressing the safety and security of the worshippers, the statement said.
Saudi Arabia urged the international community to hold Israel accountable for the escalation of the events and calls for the immediate cessation of any exacerbation violating the international pacts and treaties, it added.
In the Gaza Strip, Palestinian authorities have reported the deaths of 20 people, including nine children, as Israel attacked militants who fired rockets at Jerusalem. 
Police fired tear gas and stun grenades inside Al-Aqsa Mosque and at least three Palestinians lost an eye after being struck by plastic bullets that witnesses said were aimed directly at their heads.
Tensions on the Gaza Strip border with Israel continued to mount following recent violent confrontations at the mosque and in the Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood of Jerusalem.
More than a dozen tear gas canisters and stun grenades landed in the mosque as police and protesters faced off inside the walled compound that surrounds it. Smoke rose in front of the mosque and the golden-domed shrine on the site, and rocks littered the nearby plaza. Inside one area of the compound, shoes and debris lay scattered over ornate carpets.
The mosque is in a hilltop compound that is the third-holiest site in Islam and the holiest in Judaism. Tensions at the site, known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary and to Jews as the Temple Mount, have triggered repeated bouts of violence in the past.

— With input from AP


Saudis ready to enjoy Eid Al-Fitr with health precautions in mind

Saudis ready to enjoy Eid Al-Fitr with health precautions in mind
Prior to the pandemic, Eid celebrations were marked by family gatherings where people used to enjoy traditional cuisines. However, now people have limited their visits and avoid large gatherings due to health concerns. (File photo)
Updated 11 May 2021

Saudis ready to enjoy Eid Al-Fitr with health precautions in mind

Saudis ready to enjoy Eid Al-Fitr with health precautions in mind
  • COVID-19 pandemic may have muted celebrations but fails to dampen people’s spirit

RIYADH: As many Muslims around the world eagerly await Eid Al-Fitr to celebrate with family and loved ones, Saudis have shared their annual routines on the festive occasion, which for many, are the best part of the whole celebration.

“I wait eagerly for Eid, and I always try a month before to go to the public and popular markets with my sons and daughters before the crowds to prepare for the occasion,” Husain Al-Anazi, a human resources operations supervisor, told Arab News. He buys whatever his family needs such as clothes, supplies and sweets.
On the Eid day, Al-Anazi goes to the mosque, where he performs the Eid prayer, and then returns home “I return to the parents, brothers and children. I greet my mother, sisters and children. Then I go to greet the elderly in their homes, especially my uncles, aunts and some of the elderly relatives,” he added.
After completing the morning tour, he returns home at noon to take a nap until the afternoon to catch up on sleep, since he is used to staying up late during Ramadan. He then goes to the majlis (sitting room for guests) in the afternoon and prepares tea and coffee for visitors.
In the evening, Al-Anazi goes to the meeting place of his relatives, where a special dinner for the family is held in either the house of the eldest relative or a separate rented location. Once the dinner wraps up, he goes to his friends on a break to greet them and play cards.
In the following days, he travels with friends to any place they decide to visit.

My favorite food during Eid is mansaf, a traditional Arab dish made of lamb cooked in a sauce of fermented dried yogurt, and served with rice.

Asmhan Al-Fuhaiqi

As for Bandar Al-Ghayeb, a security worker at the Saudi Electricity Co., he rarely spends the whole Eid period with his family and relatives, as he works on a shift basis at the company.
He instead visits friends in the neighborhood, who prepare Eid meals (mostly grilled foods). “We don’t eat too much. We eat in a symbolic way, as if we are tasting food.”
Al-Ghayeb said that he also visits some relatives and other friends on the same day after taking a nap. Although he is usually physically exhausted, he feels psychologically comfortable, as it is a day where he is able to meet many people, including friends who he has not seen for years.
Al-Ghayeb is also keen to preserve the habit of “eidiya” every year, where children are gifted money by older members of the family.
The best moments of Eid for Saudi housewife Asmhan Al-Fuhaiqi are the morning of the first day, especially when she starts to put on new clothes.
“Performing Eid prayers has a special feeling. Then we meet together as family members at my father’s house, where we start distributing sweets to the guests,” she told Arab News.
Al-Fuhaiqi added the spirit of Eid shines through when groups begin to light fireworks in celebration.
“During Eid, I would be busy buying supplies, including clothes and accessories, and since I live in the town of Tayma, I cannot get everything I need, so I go with my family to the city of Tabuk (110 km away), which is the closest city to us” she said.

I go to greet the elderly in their homes, especially my uncles, aunts and some of the elderly relatives.

Husain Al-Anazi

She added that one of the most difficult things to buy during Eid is clothing, as she has to ensure that the size fits so that she does not go all the way back to Tabuk.
On the night before Eid, she makes sweets and puts them in the reception room before dawn, and perfumes the house with incense and oud.
In the past, Al-Fuhaiqi was keen to go to the prayer hall next to the city, which feels “beautifully different,” however, the situation changed after the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, and she instead visits the nearby mosque.
The family then begins to receive guests in their home, distributing gifts to the children and supervising the fireworks. “Although it is risky, I feel that fireworks give a wonderful atmosphere for Eid, so I make sure that I am the one who lights the fireworks myself, not the children.”

I will be very happy during Eid, because we visit many people, and many also visit us in a short period of time.
Ruaa Rashid

She said that her favorite food during Eid is mansaf, a traditional Arab dish made of lamb cooked in a sauce of fermented dried yogurt, and served with rice or bulgur.
Saudi child Ruaa Radhi told Arab News that her mother bought her a dress and beautiful shoes a few days ago for Eid, and bought enough fireworks from the market for her and her brothers.
“On the first day of Eid Al-Fitr, we will meet with my grandmother at her house in the presence of my aunts who live in other cities, where we will have dinner together, which is a cooked lamb that my mother and aunts cook,” she said.
Radhi’s maternal uncles usually gift her toys and sweets for Eid every year. “They usually give us light footballs and balloons. Indeed, I will be very happy during Eid, because we visit many people, and many also visit us in a short period of time.”
Nayef Al-Moaini, a Saudi engineer at Ma’aden, said that, for him, the celebration of Eid starts the night before, when preparing the house is one of the most important parts of the annual celebration.
“Celebration of Eid Al-Fitr often includes holding banquets for several days to celebrate the visitors, including our relatives coming from outside the city,” he added.
The second day of Eid is a fixed day for Al-Moaini’s family feast, which includes his uncles, their children and his neighbors.


Eid shoppers urged to be wary of virus risk in Saudi Arabia

Eid shoppers urged to be wary of virus risk in Saudi Arabia
People are seen in the Mall of Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. (REUTERS file photo)
Updated 33 min 59 sec ago

Eid shoppers urged to be wary of virus risk in Saudi Arabia

Eid shoppers urged to be wary of virus risk in Saudi Arabia
  • A Saudi ministry of Health spokesman noted that the fluctuating case numbers are a positive sign, but reiterated that the country is not in the clear just yet

JEDDAH: As the daily number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Saudi Arabia continues to hover between 950 and 1,100, authorities are calling on residents to remain careful and vigilant as they prepare for Eid Al-Fitr.
With the holiday only a few days away, shoppers are urged to remain on high alert and choose online shopping rather than visiting packed malls. Warnings have been issued that store closures are imminent if commercial establishments fail to abide by the required health and safety precautions and ensure social distancing is maintained.
It comes after more than two weeks of rising numbers of infections during Ramadan to more than 1,000 a day, which authorities said is the result of people failing to follow rules on social distancing and gatherings.
On Monday, health authorities in the Kingdom recorded 986 new cases of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), meaning 427,370 people in the country have contracted the disease.
The highest number of new infections was in the Riyadh region with 339, followed by the Makkah region with 283, and the Eastern Province with 131. Only two regions reported single-digit increases: The Northern Borders, with eight, and Jouf, with five.
An additional 1,076 people have recovered, according to health authorities, raising the total number of recoveries to 410,816. This means the recovery rate in the Kingdom has increased slightly to 96.1 percent.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Saudi Arabia recorded 986 new infections on Monday.

• 1,076 more people have recovered from the disease.

• The death toll rises to 7,085 with 13 new fatalities.

The number of active cases has been decreasing lately as recoveries increase. A Ministry of Health spokesman noted that the fluctuating case numbers are a positive sign, but reiterated that the country is not in the clear just yet. “The fluctuation could be an indicator that the cases are stabilizing,” he said on Sunday.
According to the figures announced on Monday, there are currently 9,469 active cases. Of these, 341 patients are in critical condition. Thirteen additional deaths related to COVID-19 were reported, raising the total to 7,085.
More than 10.6 million doses of COVID vaccines have been administered since vaccinations began in December. Nearly 31 percent of the Kingdom’s 34.8 million population have received at least one dose.

A total of 70,822 PCR tests for COVID-19 were carried out in the past 24 hours, raising the total number of tests in the Kingdom to nearly 17.6 million.
Saudi health clinics set up by the Ministry of Health as testing hubs or treatment centers have dealt with hundreds of thousands of people throughout the country since the start of the pandemic.

Taakad (make sure) centers provide COVID-19 tests for those who show no, or only mild, symptoms or believe they have been in contact with an infected individual. More than 9.7 million tests have been conducted at Taakad facilities.

Tetamman (rest-assured) clinics offer treatment and advice to those with more severe virus symptoms, such as breathing difficulties, fever, and loss of taste and smell. They have seen more than 2.5 million patients so far.

In addition, the Ministry of Health’s 937 call centers have received more than 35.2 million inquiries from people seeking medical advice.


Saudi ‘edupreneur’ explores opportunities in Pakistan’s education sector

Saudi ‘edupreneur’ explores opportunities in Pakistan’s education sector
Omar Farooqui, Founder of Coded Minds. (Supplied)
Updated 40 min 55 sec ago

Saudi ‘edupreneur’ explores opportunities in Pakistan’s education sector

Saudi ‘edupreneur’ explores opportunities in Pakistan’s education sector
  • The current visit of the Pakistani premier to Saudi Arabia has opened many new opportunities between the two countries

JEDDAH: A Saudi educationist has hailed growing public-private partnership ties in education between Saudi Arabia and Pakistan.
“Saudi Arabia and Pakistan have historically been like family to one another and education can be the common thread to stitch them closer,” said Omar Farooqui, founder of Coded Minds, a global ed-tech company.
He added: “Both countries have immense knowledge pools and research-driven institutions. Sharing of knowledge and formation of cross-border public-private partnerships can help implement modernization across both
nations in terms of bringing 21st-century quantum leaps in their respective ways of being.”
Farooqui, a Saudi national from Jeddah, has become the first-ever educationist in the Kingdom to invest in the private education system in Pakistan. His company, Coded Minds Pakistan, is set to provide STEM education to about 6 million students across the country.
The current visit of the Pakistani premier to Saudi Arabia has opened many new opportunities between the two countries. According to several sources, more than 30 public and private Saudi companies are keen to invest in Pakistan, including Saudi giants like Aramco, SABIC and ACWA Power.
However, Farooqui’s Coded Minds appears to be the only Saudi private venture investing in the Pakistani education sector.
So why Pakistan? Farooqui said that by directing a Saudi-owned global company, he has a first mover’s advantage in the Pakistani education sector.
“Pakistan has huge potential in all aspects of its business sector, but it remains an untapped market. It needs a first mover to take a chance on it, and education is one such sector, that through policy influence, can become a catalyst of change for a nation.”

Pakistan’s human capital and Saudi Arabia’s black gold might be combined and can have far-reaching consequences.

Omar Farooqui, Founder of Coded Minds

Farooqui added that he is among the “most fortunate” people that are living examples of the strong bonds between the two countries. “That’s why, I truly believe that education should always have been beyond boundaries by design, and it is something we practice every day on our platform.”
While noting the “new avatar of the Kingdom” and its growing relations with Pakistan — the second most populous Muslim country and fifth largest country in the world — Farooqui said that the world has “no choice but to take notice of the remarkable changes.”
He added: “The Kingdom has a young, hungry population that is by nature entrepreneurial and needs a platform to speak. Pakistan is the fifth largest country in the world and by natural selection relies on its human capital and large diaspora spread across the world that are willing and able to come back.
“Both in a way are intertwined in a revolution of sorts. Pakistani-Saudi brotherhood is a strategic wall that is crucial to the future of world trade.
“Pakistan’s human capital and Saudi Arabia’s black gold might be combined and can have far-reaching consequences. Pakistan can be a testing ground for significant breakthroughs in new-age technology as it becomes a marketplace of talent to tap into.”


Qatar’s emir arrives in Saudi Arabia on official visit

Qatar’s emir arrives in Saudi Arabia on official visit
Updated 11 May 2021

Qatar’s emir arrives in Saudi Arabia on official visit

Qatar’s emir arrives in Saudi Arabia on official visit

JEDDAH: Qatar’s Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad arrived at King Abdulaziz International Airport in Jeddah on Monday, where he was received by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Saudi Press Agency reported.
The emir received an invitation from King Salman to visit the Kingdom end of last month, which was hand delivered by Foreign Minster Prince Faisal bin Farhan.

Developing...