North Thunder is reminder of Kuwait liberation force

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Updated 20 February 2016

North Thunder is reminder of Kuwait liberation force

HAFR AL-BATIN: North Thunder, one of the biggest military exercises in the region, which is currently taking place here, is a reminder of the force that was formed to counter Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait.
About 25 years ago, Saudi Arabia hosted a coalition of 30 states that had gathered to liberate Kuwait.
North Thunder brings together 20 Arab and Muslim countries. Ten of the countries gathered here during that time at King Khaled Military City (KKMC).
The KKMC is one of the country’s newest bases, and one of the largest in the Middle East.
There are about 200,000 soldiers from Arab and Muslim countries gathered here, including Pakistan, Egypt, UAE, Malaysia, Oman, Jordan, Bahrain, Senegal, Sudan, Kuwait, Maldives, Morocco, Chad, Tunisia, Comoro Islands, Djibouti, Qatar, Mauritania and Mauritius.
The military city is equipped with a wide range of support facilities, including a military hospital, training centers, and vast areas for ground and air defense forces.
It has become a symbol of the country’s determination to fight terrorism and ensure peace prevails in the region.
Saudi Arabia is currently leading a military campaign against Iran-backed terrorists in Yemen.
In December, it also announced the formation of a 34-member alliance against terrorism.
A Saudi source said on Thursday that members of the new anti-terrorism coalition would gather in Saudi Arabia next month for its first publicly announced meeting.
Riyadh has said the alliance would share intelligence, combat violent ideologies and deploy troops if necessary.


All-female Saudi tourist group explores wonders of Tabuk

Updated 21 October 2019

All-female Saudi tourist group explores wonders of Tabuk

  • About 20 women from different parts of the Kingdom took part in the sightseeing trip to the province bordering the Red Sea

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s first all-female tourist group has explored the environmental and archaeological wonders of Tabuk in the northwest of the Kingdom.

About 20 women from different parts of the Kingdom took part in the sightseeing trip to the province bordering the Red Sea.

“They were astonished to see such sights in their country, especially the area of Ras Al-Sheikh Humaid,” said Heba Al-Aidai, a tour guide in Tabuk who organized the trip.

“They did not expect to see such a place in Saudi Arabia. They looked speechless while standing close to the turquoise water of the sea. It is a truly breathtaking view.”

Al-Aidai and her colleague Nafla Al-Anazi promoted the trip on social media and attracted a group of homemakers, teachers and staff workers from all over the Kingdom, aged from 22 to over 50.

The tour was educational, too, and the women were told about the history of the places they visited. “They were taken to the Caves of Shuaib (Magha’er Shuaib), the place where Prophet Moses fled after leaving Egypt, and where he got married to one of the daughters of Prophet Shuaib, according to some historians. It was really a positive experience,” Al-Aidai said.

The visitors also explored Tayeb Ism, a small town in northwestern Tabuk, where there is a well-known gap in the towering mountains through which water runs throughout the year.

Al-Aidai said such trips aim to encourage tourism in Tabuk, and introduce Saudi tourists and other visitors to the landmarks of the region.