Jaipur literary fest

Updated 30 January 2013

Jaipur literary fest

A group of Pakistani academics — two professors and their three students from history and political science departments of a Lahore college — set out to attend the recently held literature festival at Jaipur, India. They entered India via the Wagha land border on Jan. 24 wherein they were informed that the scheduled train to Jaipur had been cancelled and they had to go to Delhi. Next morning they took a taxi from Delhi to Jaipur.
Soon after checking in a hotel, intelligence police took them to their office. After spending six hours in their office, they were asked to go back to Delhi and get registered at a police station. When they reached Delhi, they were informed by Delhi police that they had unnecessarily traveled to Delhi and could go back to Jaipur. When they reached Jaipur on Jan. 26, they were again asked by intelligence police to complete the paperwork, which continued all day. On Jan. 27 they were able to join the literature festival that concluded on Jan. 28. Obviously it was a tactic to psychologically (and financially) scare the Pakistani guests. It would have been understandable if the opposition parties had demonstrated against the participation of Pakistani writers. However, it was the governmental machinery which appeared to be working on some previously chalked-out strategy.Not a very promising way to handle delicate relations at public level between these two odd and insensitive neighbors.


Cartoon in bad taste

Updated 07 August 2017

Cartoon in bad taste

I wish to use my “right of reply” to complain about the unfortunate caricature that appeared on Aug. 5, 2017, in your well-known newspaper. The cartoon represents President Nicolas Maduro sitting on a military tank and a hand coming out of the tank’s cannon writing on a book titled “New Constitution.” Such a caricature is offensive to my country.
What the caricature seems to imply is that President Maduro wants to rewrite a new constitution with the power of arms. This is totally false. It is immoral to give your readers such a forged image of Venezuela and its constitutionally- and democratically-elected government.
The revision of our constitution, which is among the best in the world, is mainly to reinforce it and make it more adaptable to the new times. It is not an imposition of our president; it has been backed by more than 8 million Venezuelans and has the objective of re-establishing the peace process that has been trampled by a violent opposition backed by interested foreign countries that pretend to give orders to our sovereign populace.
I fail to understand why some international media report fake news about my country, with the purpose of undermining our sovereignty, and the people of Venezuela’s absolute right to decide, in a free and independent manner, how it wants to conduct its internal affairs.
I invite your newspaper to inform about our country with the truth and the same respect that we, in Venezuela, treat to our brothers of Saudi Arabia.

Joseba Achutegui
Ambassador of Venezuela
Riyadh
Saudi Arabia