Lankan mission slams false report on jailed driver

Updated 08 July 2012

Lankan mission slams false report on jailed driver

The Sri Lankan Embassy has rejected reports in Colombo claiming yesterday a Sri Lankan domestic worker has been arrested in Saudi Arabia for worshipping a statue of the Buddha.
According to the Bodu Bala Senaa, a Buddhist organization based in Colombo, it was alleged the youth, identified as Premanath Pereralage Thungasiri, was arrested by Ummul Hamam police for worshipping the statue inside his home.
It was alleged in the report Saudi authorities were planning to execute him.
The report added: “Although a complaint has been lodged at the Sri Lanka Bureau of Foreign Employment in Colombo, under complaint no: CN/158/1205, so far no action has been taken.”
Reacting to the reports, a senior official from the mission said the whole story was totally fabricated and had nothing to do with idol worship.
The diplomat, who had met Thungasiri in jail yesterday, said that he had been booked on some other charges by police in the Ummul Hammam district.
According to the official, Thungasiri, who works as a driver, had visited another Saudi's house to resolve a dispute involving a housemaid there. He said the maid was his relative, and during the dispute police arrested him.
In his statement to the embassy, Thungasiri said his Saudi sponsor had nothing to do with the case and had surrendered his passport and other documents to prison authorities for his deportation.
It was further alleged by Bodu Bala Senaa that those employed in Muslim countries are prevented from practicing their religious faiths, and those found doing so are punished severely.
Recently a Sri Lankan woman was arrested for practicing witchcraft after she allegedly gazed at a child in a shopping complex while wearing a black cord around her wrist, the report said.
The organization accused the Sri Lanka Bureau of Foreign Employment of not educating Sri Lankan workers traveling to Saudi Arabia on the country’s religious laws.
Thungasiri has his wife and a daughter and son back home at Padiyatalawe, 200 km from Colombo.
The diplomat, responding to the allegations, said: “So far, no Sri Lankan has been found guilty of practicing his own religion in the Kingdom.”
He added no one had been executed for practicing their religion.
The official said that Vesak, the birth anniversary of the Buddha, was observed recently at the Lankan missions in the Kingdom. More than 20,000 expatriate workers attended the functions in Riyadh and Jeddah.
Subsequently, Poson, the day Buddhism was introduced to Sri Lanka, was also celebrated without any hassle at the mission's headquarters.
The diplomat said: “Besides Sri Lankan Muslim expatriates, Buddhists and Hindus from the island are also leading a happy and contented life in the Kingdom.”
He urged the Sri Lankan community not to allow parties with vested interests to tarnish the image of Saudi Arabia, home to 500,000 Sri Lankans.
The diplomat also stressed millions of foreign workers who come to the Kingdom for employment are expected to abide by the host country’s regulations.


Misk journeys into the past to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s national day

Updated 23 September 2020

Misk journeys into the past to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s national day

  • The journey begins at dawn from Turaif district in Diriyah
  • The campaign will shed light on historical locations

JEDDAH: In celebration of the 90th Saudi National Day, the Misk Foundation has launched a campaign highlighting the Kingdom’s heritage, featuring a video, cinema advertisement and a bicycle race through some of the country’s key historical sites.

The campaign will shed light on historical locations and the influential people who helped build the Kingdom. It also aims to highlight the country’s current development and prosperity.

The foundation, represented by Manga Productions, has collaborated with the King Abdul Aziz Foundation for Research and Archives and the Japanese advertising agency Centean to produce “Al-Auja” video, which tells the history of the Kingdom by highlighting heroic figures from the past.

As a first-of-a-kind project, it also documents the Kingdom's history for future generations, including efforts by the founder King Abdul Aziz to unify the country. 

Misk Foundation also released a video clip, “Rasimeen Auloumana,” which focuses on the growth, prosperity and mega-projects in the Kingdom today, while also documenting the population’s achievements and hopes.

The video takes viewers on an imagined journey by the nation’s founder as he discovers the Kingdom’s modern achievements.

The journey begins at dawn from Turaif district in Diriyah, the historical and geographical center of Saudi Arabia, where the first Saudi state was established.

King Abdul Aziz visits cities including King Abdullah Economic City, Umluj, Al-Ula and Jeddah before returning to Riyadh as he did in the past when he conquered the city with an army of only 63 men.

The campaign logo features King Abdul Aziz riding his horse, Obayya, and an imitation of the ruler’s handwriting based on his signature.

The title of the video clip is a quote from the poem of the Saudi traditional dance “Najd Shamat.”

The foundation’s celebrations will end next Wednesday with a bicycle race through key historical sites that the founder passed through during the conquest of Riyadh.

Participants will begin the journey from four sites — Abu Makhrouq Mountain, Manakh King Abdul Aziz Park, the Red Palace and Diriyah governorate — before meeting at the final gathering station, Al-Masmak Fortress.

Abu Makhrouq Mountain was a landmark for trade convoys heading to Riyadh, as well as being a park for the founder and local people.

Films produced for the national day are part of Misk’s visual productions on cultural and national events.

The foundation released several popular films, such as “Hal Al-Auja” and “Kol Meter Murabba’,” for last year’s national day, in addition to “Khuddam Al-Haram” and “Misk Al-Masha’ir” during the last two Hajj seasons.