Saudi archaeology expo draws big crowd

Updated 20 November 2012

Saudi archaeology expo draws big crowd

Hundreds of people visited the “Saudi Archaeological Masterpieces Through The Ages” exhibition that was opened for the public at the Smithsonian’s Sackler Museum in Washington D.C. Saturday night. The Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities (SCTA) also organized in collaboration with the Sackler Museum a variety of cultural events on the sidelines of the heritage exhibition.
SCTA chief Prince Sultan bin Salman formally opened the three-month event on Thursday.
An attractive event particularly liked by children was the Arabian story telling especially from the Arabian Nights. Another impressive cultural program was called “the Family Day.’
In a seminar on the cultural heritage of the Kingdom, participating research students shed light on the cultural and trade relations the Arabian Peninsula had with other regions in the world thanks to the caravan routes that used to meet in ancient Arab cities.
Visitors toured around exotically arranged pavilions and listened to the explanation of each item particularly about the rock inscriptions, wall paintings and utensils dating back to thousands of years.
Excited visitors also formed long lines at the calligraphy section to get their names written in various calligraphic styles.
Visitors were also treated to qahwa and dates in the ancient Arabia style. They also viewed the traditional style of coffee preparation.
The rare artifacts showcased at the exhibition are taken from the National Museum in Riyadh, King Saud University Museum, King Fahd National Library, King Faisal Center for Research and Islamic Studies, King Abdul Aziz Library in Madinah.


What We Are Reading Today: Manhattan by Jennifer Thermes

Updated 08 December 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Manhattan by Jennifer Thermes

  • This volume is a rich, multilayered creation worth leisurely exploration

This is an excellent book about the history of Manhattan island, staring with the indigenous tribes who lived there.

Jennifer Thermes’ illustrated chronicle of the history of Manhattan “is filled with a series of loose-limbed, eye-pleasing maps that trace the island’s transformation from the natural landscape of the native Lenape people to the newly built Dutch and English colony to the gridded American metropolis of the early 19th century and so on until the current day,” said a review in The New York Times.

It added: “Thermes has a gift not only for rendering delicate watercolor, colored pencil and ink illustrations but for narrating history in a way that inspires wonder. How terrifying it must have been to live through the Great Fire of 1835! And how exciting it must have been to ride that first subway in 1904!”

The review said: “Just like Manhattan itself, this volume is a rich, multilayered creation worth leisurely exploration. And it will give all children growing up in New York City a new perspective on their hometown.”