Canada to take 10,000 more refugees

Updated 10 August 2015

Canada to take 10,000 more refugees

OTTAWA: Canada will take an additional 10,000 refugees from Iraq and Syria over the next four years if the Conservative government is re-elected in October, Prime Minister Stephen Harper pledged on Monday.
Canada has already settled roughly 20,000 Iraqi refugees and 2,500 Syrians, he told reporters at a campaign event in Toronto. The Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada website shows it finalized 19,900 refugee claims from all countries in 2014.
Harper said, however, that the scale of the humanitarian crisis was such that it cannot come close to being solved by refugee policy alone.
“We must stop ISIS,” he said, referring to the Islamic State militant group operating in the area.
The comments come a day after Harper said he would make it a criminal offense for Canadians to travel to areas controlled by groups designated as terrorist entities, such as Islamic State, if he is re-elected.
Canada is part of a US-led coalition conducting air strikes on Islamic State targets in Syria and Iraq since last year.
Most polls show the ruling Conservatives slightly trailing the official opposition New Democrats ahead of the Oct. 19 election. The Liberal party is in third place.


Yemeni government, STC discuss coalition under Riyadh Agreement

Updated 6 min 57 sec ago

Yemeni government, STC discuss coalition under Riyadh Agreement

  • Prime Minister Maeen Abdulmalik Saeed met on Thursday with STC representatives in Riyadh
  • The discussions between the two sides come under the Riyadh Agreement signed in November last year

DUBAI: The Saudi-backed government of Yemen met with the Southern Transitional Council (STC) to discuss the political components to form the new government as part of a power-sharing deal. 
Prime Minister Maeen Abdulmalik Saeed met on Thursday with STC representatives in Riyadh to outline reforms to unite national ranks between the anti-Houthi coalition, according to state news agency Saba New.
Both sides discussed the priorities of the new government to face existing challenges in the political, military, security, service and economic sectors. Sustainable reforms and addressing corruption, were also on the agenda. 
The discussions between the two sides come under the Riyadh Agreement signed in November last year. 
The new government will look to face current economic challenges in the war-torn country with the aim to stop the deterioration of the national currency exchange rate, as well as the humanitarian situation.

Meanwhile, President Abdrabbu Mansour Hadi left Saudi Arabia and headed to the United States for medical treatment

The head of the country’s internationally-recognised government, who has lived in exile in Riyadh since the Iranian-aligned Houthi group captured the Yemeni capital Sanaa in 2015, has been treated for a heart condition since 2011.