Hormuz canal idea rejected

Updated 21 April 2016

Hormuz canal idea rejected

JEDDAH: The Saudi Geological Survey (SGS) has argued that it would be too difficult and costly to build a canal linking the Arabian Gulf with the Arabian Sea to bypass the Hormuz Strait.
SGS President Zuhair Nawab told Arab News that in addition to the massive costs likely to be incurred, there would also be significant other problems including high mountains and desert terrain.
Nawab’s comments come in the wake of a report in the local media that the plan for the 1,000 km-long canal was being studied by the Saudi Electricity Company.

The report quoted an article published in Al-Muhandis magazine published by the Saudi Council of Engineers.
Esmat Al-Hakeem, an engineer, was quoted as saying that the aim was not only to transport oil but also generate electricity through nuclear power stations. The project was first proposed seven years ago.
The proposed canal would start from the Arabian Sea and pass through Omani and Yemeni territory before reaching Rub Al-Khali or the Empty Quarter in the Kingdom.
Several small canals would be constructed inside the Kingdom to be linked with the big canal, he said, adding that a nuclear power plant would be set up on every canal to produce 50 gigawatts of electricity, and desalinated water. The plants would be established in the Empty Quarter away from residential cities.
Huge agricultural projects would be established in green houses to produce vegetables and different types of flowers. Fish, poultry and dairy farms are other projects planned.
Plans include solar power fields in the Empty Quarter to produce 50 gigawatts of electricity. He said there would be huge plants set up for manufacturing heavy and light vehicles, intermediate and high-speed ships, trucks and solar panels. The study has proposed the establishment of two airports.


Erdogan says Haftar cannot be expected to respect Libya truce

Updated 17 min 36 sec ago

Erdogan says Haftar cannot be expected to respect Libya truce

ANKARA: Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said on Sunday that eastern Libyan military commander Khalifa Haftar could not be expected to respect a cease-fire called between his forces and pro-government troops in Libya.
Commenting on reported violations of the truce, Erdogan said: “It is not possible to expect mercy and understanding from someone like this (Haftar) on the cease-fire.”
Turkey backs Libya’s internationally recognized government based in Tripoli and has repeatedly described Haftar and his forces as illegitimate.