Nigeria seeks Niger’s military support against Boko Haram

Updated 22 May 2013

Nigeria seeks Niger’s military support against Boko Haram

NIAMEY: Nigeria has asked neighboring Niger for support in a week-old offensive against insurgent bases in its semi-desert frontier region, underlining moves toward West African cooperation against jihadis seen as a cross-border threat.
Concerns grew particularly after militants associated with Al-Qaeda seized the north of Mali last year and were dislodged only after French-led military intervention.
Nigeria declared a state of emergency in its northeast states of Borno, Yobe and Adamawa last week before unleashing forces on well-armed and determined Boko Haram militants. Nigeria claimed some early successes on Monday.

Nurudeen Muhammed, Nigeria’s minister of state for foreign affairs, delivered the request for help from President Goodluck Jonathan to his Nigerien counterpart Mahamadou Issoufou late on Monday in Niamey.
“We currently have military operations under way in Nigeria in three federal states to combat terrorism and we would like to have Niger’s support in the common fight against these terrorists,” Muhammed told Niger state television.
Military sources say Nigerian forces have faced stiff resistance by hardened Islamist rebels entrenched in the north and using cross-border routes to smuggle in weapons.
Nigeria and Niger signed a bilateral defense pact in October 2012 that includes sharing intelligence on militant groups and joint military exercises. The deal stipulates that a request for military aid by one nation cannot be refused by the other.
The two West African nations share a porous frontier of more than 1,500 km (940 miles). The fighting in Nigeria has pushed more than a thousand refugees across the border into Niger in the past few weeks, according to UN estimates.
Soldiers from Niger and neighboring Chad participated with Nigerian forces in a joint assault on Boko Haram fighters last month in Baga, a fishing settlement on the shores of Lake Chad.
Neighbouring countries were alarmed last year when jihadi militants overran vast tracts of Mali’s desert north, imposing a violent form of sharia (Islamic law) and establishing training camps, some of which trained Boko Haram operatives.
A lightning French offensive ousted the Islamists from northern Mali’s towns but rural pockets of insurgents remain. France is now due to hand over to a UN peacekeeping force made up mostly of African troops, the bulk of them Nigerian.
A spokesman for Nigeria’s military denied reports that its offensive against Boko Haram would force Abuja to pull some of its 1,200 troops out of Mali.


600,000 Rohingya still in Myanmar at ‘serious risk of genocide’: UN

Updated 10 min 14 sec ago

600,000 Rohingya still in Myanmar at ‘serious risk of genocide’: UN

  • Some 740,000 Rohingya fled burning villages, bringing accounts of murder, rape and torture from Myanmar
  • UN team says the 600,000 Rohingya still inside Myanmar’s Rakhine state

YANGON: Rohingya Muslims remaining in Myanmar still face a “serious risk of genocide,” UN investigators said Monday, warning the repatriation of a million already driven from the country by the army remains “impossible.”
The fact-finding mission to Myanmar, set up by the Human Rights Council, last year branded the army operations in 2017 as “genocide” and called for the prosecution of top generals, including army chief Min Aung Hlaing.
Some 740,000 Rohingya fled burning villages, bringing accounts of murder, rape and torture over the border to sprawling refugee camps in Bangladesh, where survivors of previous waves of persecution already languish.
But in a damning report, the UN team said the 600,000 Rohingya still inside Myanmar’s Rakhine state remain in deteriorating and “deplorable” conditions.
“Myanmar continues to harbor genocidal intent and the Rohingya remain under serious risk of genocide,” the investigators said in their final report on Myanmar, due to be presented Tuesday in Geneva.
The country is “denying wrongdoing, destroying evidence, refusing to conduct effective investigations and clearing, razing, confiscating and building on land from which it displaced Rohingya,” it said.
Myanmar military spokesman Zaw Min Tun rejected the team’s findings, calling them “one-sided.”
“Instead of making biased accusations, they should go onto the ground to see the reality,” Zaw Min Tun said.