Study: Vegetarians live longer as men get best results

Updated 05 June 2013

Study: Vegetarians live longer as men get best results

CALIFORNIA: A vegetarian diet may help people, particularly men, live longer than those who regularly eat meat, according to a study of more than 70,000 Seventh-Day Adventists.
Researchers followed the participants an average of six years. During that period, vegetarians, including those who also added seafood or dairy and egg products to their diet, had an average 12 percent lower chance of dying from any cause than meat-eaters, according to the findings published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. The study also found that male vegetarians were less likely to die from heart disease than non-vegetarians, while there were no similar results in women.
Vegetarian diets have been associated with a reduction in chronic diseases like high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease, the researchers said. The latest findings confirm earlier studies that show the health benefits of eating a vegetarian diet, said Michael Orlich, the lead study author.
“People should take these kinds of results into account as they’re considering dietary choices,” said Orlich, an assistant professor of preventive medicine at Loma Linda University, a Seventh-Day Adventist institution in Loma Linda, California, in a May 31 telephone interview. “Various types of vegetarian diets may be beneficial in reducing the risk of death compared to non-vegetarian diets.”
It’s not clear whether avoiding red meat and processed meats plays a role in boosting life or whether the foods that vegetarians are eating lowers their risk of dying compared with non-vegetarians, Orlich said. He said he is planning a study to help identify which foods are explaining these results.
Those in the study were given a questionnaire to assess their diet. Researchers found that 5,548 people were vegans, 21,177 were vegetarians that ate dairy and egg products, 7,194 were vegetarians that included fish in their diets and 4,031 were semi-vegetarian, which includes eating meat infrequently. The rest were meat eaters.


What We Are Eating Today: Melted

Updated 23 October 2020

What We Are Eating Today: Melted

A group of Saudi friends with a tasty business idea have found sweet success with their chocolate brownie venture.
The pals launched their project, Melted, in Jeddah four years ago to establish their own brand of brownies and their creations have since proved a hit with connoisseurs of the confection.
Melted offers an array of mouthwatering multiflavored brownies including classic chocolate milk, lotus, peanut butter chocolate, and Arabic coffee while its recently released rich, dark chocolate, raspberry brownie bar adds a fruity twist to the range.
Its signature cookie is chewy, warm, and filled with a mix of chocolate chips and Melted also produces seasonal flavors such as birthday blondies, and colorful vanilla fudge bars. In addition, its Karak bars are a cakey combination of black tea, cardamom, and cloves infused with sweet notes of cinnamon.
All the bars are served in jars with the customer’s name printed on the side.
For more information visit Instagram @melted.sa