Brotherhood loses grip as anger boils

Updated 18 August 2013

Brotherhood loses grip as anger boils

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood and its allies suffered a heavy blow from the state security crackdown, their central coordination has been lost and the bloodshed means anger is now “beyond control,” the group said.
The comments by spokesman Gehad El-Haddad pointed to the depth of the crisis facing the movement that just six weeks ago controlled the presidency, but is now struggling to keep a grip over its base with hundreds killed by the police. Haddad said he did not know where all of the group’s leaders were following the attack on two protest camps.
He added that two of them had been shot when the police moved to break up the camps. “The real danger comes when groups of people, angry by the loss of loved ones, start mobilizing on the ground.”
As the death toll soared to 578, weeping relatives in search of loved ones uncovered the faces of the bloodied, unclaimed dead in a Cairo.
US President Barack Obama canceled exercises with Egypt’s military to protest the killing, but stopped short of suspending $1.3 billion in annual aid. Obama urged army-installed authorities to lift emergency and allow peaceful dissent, saying he “strongly” condemned the crackdown on demonstrators.
The Washington Post wrote that the Obama administration was “complicit” in the crackdown as it had shown to Egypt’s rulers “that its warnings were not credible.”
Meanwhile, Egypt’s Interior Ministry has instructed police to use live ammunition against anyone who attacks government buildings.
The announcement came after hundreds of protesters attacked the local government offices in Giza.
Saudi Ambassador to Egypt, Ahmed Kattan, has urged Saudis in Egypt to follow curfew instructions. The month-long curfew is from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. Phone numbers have been given for any help required. Saudi Embassy in Cairo (0237625000), Alexandria Consulate (034977596) Suez Consulate (01279000005/0122787775/0172900077)

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250 German navy soldiers join EU mission to enforce Libya arms embargo

Updated 04 August 2020

250 German navy soldiers join EU mission to enforce Libya arms embargo

  • The frigate left from the port of Wilhelmshaven to start an EU five-month mission
  • The mission aims to enforce the embargo, collect data on illegal oil exports, and tackle migrant crisis

CAIRO: A German navy frigate carrying 250 soldiers headed to the Mediterranean on Tuesday to join an EU mission aimed at enforcing a UN arms embargo on Libya. 
The frigate left from the port of Wilhelmshaven to start a five-month mission tasked with preventing the flow of weapons into war-torn Libya.
The EU mission Operation Irini, launched in May, was hampered by escalating fighting across the country, which saw Turkey intervene in recent months. 
The mission aims to enforce the embargo, collect data on Libya’s illegal oil exports as well as its migrant smuggling crisis.  
The crew members are set to return on Dec. 20, DPA, an international German news agency reported. They may not land until the mentioned date due to coronavirus fears, the report added. 
Turkey has been accused of exacerbating the war in Libya, providing drones, weapons and allied fighters from Syria to help Libya’s government based in the capital, Tripoli.
That administration, which is backed by an array of militias, has been fighting the forces of commander Khalifa Haftar, who is loyal to a rival administration in the east of the country.
Libya has been torn by violence since long-time ruler Muammar Qaddafi was deposed and killed in 2011.