Brotherhood loses grip as anger boils

Updated 18 August 2013

Brotherhood loses grip as anger boils

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood and its allies suffered a heavy blow from the state security crackdown, their central coordination has been lost and the bloodshed means anger is now “beyond control,” the group said.
The comments by spokesman Gehad El-Haddad pointed to the depth of the crisis facing the movement that just six weeks ago controlled the presidency, but is now struggling to keep a grip over its base with hundreds killed by the police. Haddad said he did not know where all of the group’s leaders were following the attack on two protest camps.
He added that two of them had been shot when the police moved to break up the camps. “The real danger comes when groups of people, angry by the loss of loved ones, start mobilizing on the ground.”
As the death toll soared to 578, weeping relatives in search of loved ones uncovered the faces of the bloodied, unclaimed dead in a Cairo.
US President Barack Obama canceled exercises with Egypt’s military to protest the killing, but stopped short of suspending $1.3 billion in annual aid. Obama urged army-installed authorities to lift emergency and allow peaceful dissent, saying he “strongly” condemned the crackdown on demonstrators.
The Washington Post wrote that the Obama administration was “complicit” in the crackdown as it had shown to Egypt’s rulers “that its warnings were not credible.”
Meanwhile, Egypt’s Interior Ministry has instructed police to use live ammunition against anyone who attacks government buildings.
The announcement came after hundreds of protesters attacked the local government offices in Giza.
Saudi Ambassador to Egypt, Ahmed Kattan, has urged Saudis in Egypt to follow curfew instructions. The month-long curfew is from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. Phone numbers have been given for any help required. Saudi Embassy in Cairo (0237625000), Alexandria Consulate (034977596) Suez Consulate (01279000005/0122787775/0172900077)

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Iraqi security forces raid Baghdad’s main protest camp, shoot at demonstrators

Updated 25 January 2020

Iraqi security forces raid Baghdad’s main protest camp, shoot at demonstrators

  • The clashes took place after authorities began removing concrete barriers near Tahrir Square and across at least one main bridge over the Tigris River in Baghdad
  • Security forces began the raids just hours after populist cleric Moqtada Al-Sadr said he wound halt the involvement of his supporters in the anti-government unrest

BAGHDAD: Iraqi security forces raided Baghdad’s main protest site at Tahrir Square on Saturday, firing live rounds and tear gas at anti-government demonstrators who have camped out there for months, Reuters reporters said.
There were no immediate reports of casualties but at least seven people were wounded in clashes with police earlier in the day, medics and security sources said.
The clashes took place after authorities began removing concrete barriers near Tahrir Square and across at least one main bridge over the Tigris River in Baghdad.
In the southern city of Basra, security forces raided the main anti-government sit-in overnight and deployed in force to stop protesters gathering there again, security sources said. Police arrested at least 16 protesters in Basra, they said.
The actions appeared to be an attempt to fully clear out anti-government sit-ins and end months of popular demonstrations that have called for the removal of Iraq’s entire ruling elite.
Security forces began the raids just hours after populist cleric Moqtada Al-Sadr said he wound halt the involvement of his supporters in the anti-government unrest.
Sadr had supported the demands of protesters for the removal of corrupt politicians and provision of services and jobs soon after the demonstrations began in October but stopped short of calling all his followers to join in.
Many of Sadr’s millions of supporters who hail from Baghdad’s slums have been involved in demonstrations, however.
Sadr’s followers held a march on Friday calling for a removal of US troops from the country in a rally separate from the anti-government protests. The march, which some observers expected to descend into violence, dissipated after several hours.
Sadr wrote on Twitter late on Friday that he would “try not to interfere in the issue (of protesters), either negatively or positively, so that they can shepherd the fate of Iraq.” He did not elaborate.
In Basra, protesters urged Sadr to reconsider what they said was a withdrawal of support for popular demonstrations. In a letter circulated on social media, they called for the support of Sadrists, without whom they feared attacks by security forces.