No visas for firms not registered with Saudi Post

No visas for firms not registered with Saudi Post
Updated 22 August 2013

No visas for firms not registered with Saudi Post

No visas for firms not registered with Saudi Post

Companies that fail to join or activate the national address service with Saudi Post will be banned from recruitment, beginning from Dul Qaada 1 (Sept. 7), the Labor Ministry warned on Saturday.
It urged all companies to speed up their efforts to receive the service before the deadline to benefit from its various advantages.
Access to all other services of the ministry would also be linked with postal service activation, beginning Jan. 2, it said. “This measure will also be linked with the Nitaqat system,” it added.
“The acceptance of applications for recruitment will depend on whether the firm has registered or activated the national postal service,” said Labor Minister Adel Fakeih.
The ministry had signed an agreement with Saudi Post to renew and upgrade the addresses of private firms. The postal address will help labor inspectors locate a firm quickly and give it summons in case of a labor dispute. “It will also support the ongoing labor correction process,” the minister said.
Meanwhile, the World Bank said knowledge economy projects in the Kingdom would create 700,000 new jobs.
The bank called for greater investments in knowledge economy to fight unemployment in the Arab region.


Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Iraqi president discuss cooperation

Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Iraqi president discuss cooperation
Updated 26 January 2021

Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Iraqi president discuss cooperation

Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Iraqi president discuss cooperation
  • They discussed relations and ways of enhancing them in all fields

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman received a phone call from Iraqi President Barham Salih, Saudi Press Agency reported on Tuesday.
During the call, they reviewed relations between the two countries, in addition to discussing ways of enhancing bilateral cooperation in a way that serves the interests of the two countries in various fields, within the framework of the Saudi-Iraqi Coordination Council.
Saudi Arabia and Iraq opened the Arar border crossing for trade for the first time in three decades in November last year. The crossing had been closed since 1990 after the two countries cut ties following Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait.
Also in November, a Saudi delegation led by the Kingdom’s commerce and industry and agricultural ministers visited Baghdad as part of the framework of the Saudi-Iraqi Coordination Council and the Economic, Trade, Investment, Development and Joint Relief Committee.
A Saudi-Iraqi businessmen forum was also launched on the side-lines of the visit, under the auspices of the Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi. 
The Saudi-Iraqi rapprochement extends back to 2015, when Saudi Arabia reopened its embassy in Baghdad following a 25-year break.
In July Saudi Arabia and Iraq signed investment agreements on energy and sports.