Swedish king, 40 years on throne, invites everyone to dance

Updated 22 September 2013

Swedish king, 40 years on throne, invites everyone to dance

STOCKHOLM: Sweden’s King Carl XVI Gustaf celebrated 40 years as monarch Sunday in true Scandinavian egalitarian style by inviting everyone to come and dance at the royal palace.
“I invite everybody to a music and dance party in the inner courtyard of the royal palace,” the 67-year-old said according to national Swedish radio.
“And everybody is welcome. Bring your dancing shoes. Cheers!“
The king showed the way by asking his spouse for the past 37 years, German-born Queen Silvia, up for a dance on a huge plastic floor laid out on the cobbled courtyard.
Carl XVI Gustaf, whose father died in an airplane accident in 1947, succeeded his grandfather Gustav VI Adolf in 1973.
In an interview with the national broadcaster prepared for the anniversary, the king was asked how much longer he intended to stay in the job.
“I can’t answer that. It will be determined by my health gradually. But I think it’s very exciting because there is so much happening in the world around us,” he said.
A survey of 1,000 Swedes published by the Social Democrat-leaning newspaper Aftonbladet in January showed 60 percent supporting Carl XVI Gustaf relinquishing his duties to his oldest daughter, 36-year-old Victoria.


Man eats $120,000 piece of art — a banana taped to wall

Updated 08 December 2019

Man eats $120,000 piece of art — a banana taped to wall

MIAMI: The move was bananas ... or maybe the work was just too appealing.
A performance artist shook up the crowd at the Art Basel show in Miami Beach on Saturday when he grabbed a banana that had been duct-taped to a gallery wall and ate it.
The banana was, in fact, a work of art by Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan titled “Comedian” and sold to a French collector for $120,000.
In a video posted on his Instagram account, David Datuna, who describes himself as a Georgian-born American artist living in New York, walks up to the banana and pulls it off the wall with the duct tape attached.
“Art performance ... hungry artist,” he said, as he peeled the fruit and took a bite. “Thank you, very good.”
A few bystanders could be heard giggling before a flustered gallery official whisked him to an adjoining space for questioning.
But the kerfuffle was resolved without a food fight.
“He did not destroy the art work. The banana is the idea,” Lucien Terras, director of museum relations for Galerie Perrotin, told the Miami Herald.
As it turns out, the value of the work is in the certificate of authenticity, the newspaper said. The banana is meant to be replaced.
A replacement banana was taped to the wall about 15 minutes after Datuna’s stunt.
“This has brought a lot of tension and attention to the booth and we’re not into spectacles,” Terras said. “But the response has been great. It brings a smile to a lot of people’s faces.”
Cattelan is perhaps best known for his 18-carat, fully functioning gold toilet called “America” that he had once offered on loan to US President Donald Trump.
The toilet, valued at around $5 to $6 million, was in the news again in September when it was stolen from Britain’s Blenheim Palace, the birthplace of wartime leader Winston Churchill, where it had been on display.