Celebrating Eid Al-Adha in the US

Celebrating Eid Al-Adha in the US
Updated 29 January 2014

Celebrating Eid Al-Adha in the US

Celebrating Eid Al-Adha in the US

Muslims in the US celebrated Eid Al-Adha with religious fervor. While it was a time for family festivities and community gathering for many it was also a time for ‘meaty’ decisions: Where and how should one offer the sacrifice of the animals, should they get a cow, goat or lamb?
Shahid (not his real name as he did not wish to be identified) has been living in the US for the past 15 years. He works for a big and famous car manufacturer but for 11 years he owned and ran a farm.
“My decision to buy a farm was to raise goats especially for Eid Al-Adha because my children were young and I wanted to teach them and expose them to the true spirit of sacrificing and slaughtering animals during Eid Al Adha. In the US, 50 percent people send money home and have their animals slaughtered there. If we want our children to learn and carry on the spirit of Eid to the next generation, I feel it’s important that they see and participate in the sacrifice of animals here at home.”
Shahid said he was very popular with his friends especially during Eid Al-Adha. Everyone came to his farm and slaughtered their animals. “I learned by trial and error. I remember in the beginning I bought a few she goats and had to get a veterinarian who did ultrasounds on them to make sure they were not pregnant as you cannot sacrifice a pregnant goat.”
Shahid said more and more people were choosing to slaughter their own animals because they want their children to learn and carry on the tradition. The American farmers too are now realizing that raising goats is big business. "In 2008, you could buy a goat for $35. The same goat now sells for at least $200.”
This year Shahid sold his farm. “My wife was very happy. She felt that it was not very good for my reputation. She felt I was being known as the ‘Bakray wala’ (the goat guy). I told the American guy who bought my farm, not to be alarmed as there were over 100 goat skeletons and skin buried in the farm.”
Shahid said that back home so many organizations fought over the collection of skin as it fetched top money. “Here unfortunately skin has no value, we end up burying it.”
Arshad sacrificed a cow for the first time this Eid. “The cow cost $1200 and each person got about 55 pounds of meat. “It was a tough experience for me because the farm I went to cut up the whole cow in very big chunk of meat, filled it up in eight big garbage bags and gave it to me. I had to take it all home and cut it up in manageable pieces. I had to do that in my garage. It took hours to do the job. My wife was overwhelmed but happy because after years we got to eat fresh meat.”
Adnan who just moved to Columbus from Chicago was celebrating his first Eid Al-Adha. He ordered a goat from the local butcher. The cost was $5.99 per pound. “I will get the meat in a week as the butcher has too many orders. He slaughtered the animals on the first and second day of Eid and put them in the chiller. Later he will cut up the meat and tell us how much money we owe.
“In Chicago things are very well organized. We went to a slaughter house where we were given scrubs and we had to cover our hair and beard. Our goats came on a moving gurney, tied, upside down. The butcher gave us a sharp knife. I was real nervous as it was the first time I was slaughtering an animal. But I was surprised it felt like a knife going through butter. The blood was drained and it moved on to the next assembly line where it was skinned, cut up and packed all pretty quickly.”
A lady who did not wish to be identified said, “I have high cholesterol and my husband suffers from hypertension so we don’t need to eat so much red meat. We sent money to India to get our animals sacrificed. The meat was donated to an orphan’s wedding and an orphanage. We felt very good and feel this option is the best for us.”
Eid Al-Adha meat is big business — a few minutes of web surfing showed hundreds of sites where you can order a mountain goat, a red goat, a black and white cow and much more. You can have the meat delivered to your doorsteps or to hundreds of cities in your hometown.
Children, especially boys were very excited about watching the animals being slaughtered. Most girls refused to see it. Women complained about dealing with so much meat and all were happy that though it’s a 3-day festivities, in the US it lasts only one day. Next day its back to work and business as usual!


‘Wuf,’ a fantastical love story narrated by a canine

‘Wuf,’ a fantastical love story narrated by a canine
Updated 12 April 2021

‘Wuf,’ a fantastical love story narrated by a canine

‘Wuf,’ a fantastical love story narrated by a canine

CHICAGO: A fantastical novel that took the Turkish literary world by storm, Kemal Varol’s “Wuf” is a love story narrated by a canine. Translated into English by Dayla Rogers, the novel takes place in the 1990s amid a war between the southerners and northerners. Mikasa, the main character and a young street pup, learns about life and how to survive between the big city and the mountain town where he attempts to find shelter, food, friends and love. His journey will transform him into a legend and an enigma.

With a politically charged backdrop of the conflict between the Kurdistan Workers’ Party and the state, Varol layers his surrealist novel with humor, tragedy, friendship and the horrors of war that befall places, people, animals and the natural landscape. He keeps a politically realistic and emotional novel accessible to everyone, according to Rogers in the translator’s statement, as she points out that Varol “manages to capture multiple perspectives in the conflict thanks to myriad characters who straddle social divides.” Varol creates his main character as a bridge to opposing worlds, and in doing so allows for the story to reach eyes, ears and hearts on all sides of the conflict.

Readers first meet Mikasa at a shelter along a mountain road. He arrives half alive, wounded and bloody, and sleeps for seven days as his fellow kennel-mates speculate about who he is. They are in the middle of a war, as is evident by the army trucks and soldiers that pass on the road day and night. There are rumors among the dogs about what is going on in a world that they are kept from, but Mikasa fills in the gaps as he recalls his life, the war, the destruction and hardship, and Melsa, his love.

Varol’s novel references real political events that inundated the country in the 1990s. In Mikasa, a dog who has been forced to survive his entire life without his family and as a minesweeper during the conflict, Varol captures the devastation of war and the comradery between creatures when fighting for life. Through the eyes of his canines, Varol writes about life that surrounds war, those who want to fight, those who do not want to fight, and those who are caught in the middle.


Palestinian DJ duo Simi, Haze Khadra show support for Lebanese creatives

 Palestinian DJ duo Simi, Haze Khadra show support for Lebanese creatives
Updated 12 April 2021

Palestinian DJ duo Simi, Haze Khadra show support for Lebanese creatives

 Palestinian DJ duo Simi, Haze Khadra show support for Lebanese creatives

DUBAI: US-Palestinian twins and DJ duo Simi and Haze Khadra showed support for Lebanese creatives this week by wearing merchandise from Ya Habibi Market, an online streetwear store designed to support artists from the Middle East.

Simi championed the brand’s Laurel Soap Official Stamp sweater and wrote on her Instagram Stories: “All proceeds go to Impact Lebanon.” 

(Instagram/@simihaze)

The duo, whose real names are Sama and Haya, were born in Palestine, but grew up between Saudi Arabia and the UAE. They are the younger sisters of Fai Khadra, who first made waves when he accompanied model and reality television star Kendall Jenner to Justin Bieber and Hailey Baldwin’s wedding in September 2018. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Simi & Haze (@simihaze)

Ya Habibi Market started after the Aug. 4, 2020 explosion in Beirut’s port area, with the aim of uniting artists in the region and helping those affected by the blast.


Saudi Culture Ministry invites feedback from calligraphers 

Saudi Culture Ministry invites feedback from calligraphers 
Ministry of culture invites feedback from Saudi calligraphers. (SPA)
Updated 12 April 2021

Saudi Culture Ministry invites feedback from calligraphers 

Saudi Culture Ministry invites feedback from calligraphers 
  • The Ministry of Culture launched the “Year of Arabic Calligraphy” initiative, which comes under Vision 2030’s Quality of Life Program

RIYADH: The Saudi Ministry of Culture has invited calligraphers to participate in a questionnaire to survey its efforts to develop their capabilities in the Kingdom.
The “Cultural Exchange” survey was launched on Sunday via the link: https://surveys.moc.gov.sa/CE
The survey comes as part of the art residency program for Arabic calligraphy, which falls under the “Year of Arabic Calligraphy 2020-2021” initiative.
The ministry works in cooperation with international institutes specializing in Arabic calligraphy to benefit the Kingdom’s artists through the exchange of cultural experiences and offering Saudi artists the opportunity to enroll in international courses.
The Ministry of Culture launched the “Year of Arabic Calligraphy” initiative, which comes under Vision 2030’s Quality of Life Program, to celebrate this pillar of the Arab cultural identity. Recognizing the fine artform with a history spanning as far back as the Arab civilization, the initiative has enhanced the presence of Arabic calligraphy throughout the Kingdom. 


Saudi artist in the driver’s seat for new Jeddah street project

Saudi artist in the driver’s seat for new Jeddah street project
Shalimar Sharbatly will paint a new set of vehicles for the Draw a Nation initiative. (Supplied)
Updated 10 April 2021

Saudi artist in the driver’s seat for new Jeddah street project

Saudi artist in the driver’s seat for new Jeddah street project
  • Draw a Nation comes within the framework of initiatives to improve the visual appeal of Jeddah’s streetscapes

RIYADH: A Saudi abstract artist who won global recognition for her hand-painted and customized cars will paint a new set of vehicles for an extended edition of the Draw a Nation initiative after signing an agreement with the Jeddah municipality.
Shalimar Sharbatly, a pioneer of the “Moving Art” school, was responsible for both a hand-painted, customized Porsche 911, showcased at the Paris Motor Show, and a Formula 1 racer, known as “La Torq,” which was unveiled at the 2017 Monaco Grand Prix.
Both vehicles were also exhibited at the Louvre museum in Paris as part of a “Moving Art” exhibition in 2017.
However, within the Kingdom, Sharbatly is best known for the Draw a Nation initiative, which saw her showcase several of her hand-painted vehicles during last year’s Saudi National Day celebrations.
Sharbatly was inspired to upcycle old cars after witnessing an accident while driving along the beach in Jeddah. She told Arab News that painting the vehicles helped her regain a sense of purpose.

BACKGROUND

Shalimar Sharbatly, a pioneer of the ‘Moving Art’ school, was responsible for both a hand-painted, customized Porsche 911, showcased at the Paris Motor Show, and a Formula 1 racer, known as ‘La Torq,’ which was unveiled at the 2017 Monaco Grand Prix.

“I had become disillusioned with art and was lacking passion. I started painting these cars, turning abandoned vehicles that were deemed useless into vibrant and beautiful works of art that could gain a second life. I hope that when others view these pieces, they will feel the same joy I felt when I was painting them,” she said.
Draw a Nation comes within the framework of initiatives to improve the visual appeal of Jeddah’s streetscapes. The goal is to paint a number of old and abandoned cars and vehicles, turning them into works of art that enrich the city.
Ayed Al-Zahrani, undersecretary for the mayor of Jeddah for community service, said: “The community will benefit from recycling cars and turning them into artistic masterpieces displayed in public for Jeddah residents and visitors.”
The Jeddah municipality also previously launched the “Yalla Jeddah” platform, which invites innovators in all fields to address challenges facing Jeddah’s art scene.


Egypt to unveil ‘portion’ of 3,000-year old city

Egypt to unveil ‘portion’ of 3,000-year old city
Updated 10 April 2021

Egypt to unveil ‘portion’ of 3,000-year old city

Egypt to unveil ‘portion’ of 3,000-year old city
  • Famed Egyptologist Zahi Hawass had announced earlier this week the discovery of the “lost golden city”
  • Items of jewelry have been unearthed, along with colored pottery vessels, scarab beetle amulets and mud bricks

LUXOR: Archaeologists near Luxor have unearthed just a portion of the “largest” ancient city ever found in Egypt and dating to a golden pharaonic age 3,000 years ago, officials said Saturday.
Famed Egyptologist Zahi Hawass had announced earlier this week the discovery of the “lost golden city,” saying the site was uncovered near Luxor, home of the legendary Valley of the Kings.
“We found one portion of the city only. But the city extends to the west and the north,” Hawass told AFP Saturday ahead of a press conference in the archaeologically rich area.
Betsy Bryan, professor of Egyptian art and archaeology at Johns Hopkins University, had said the find was the “second most important archaeological discovery since the tomb of Tutankhamun” nearly a century ago, according to the excavation team’s statement on Thursday.
Items of jewelry have been unearthed, along with colored pottery vessels, scarab beetle amulets and mud bricks bearing seals of Amenhotep III.
The team began excavations in September between the temples of Ramses III and Amenhotep III near Luxor, some 500 kilometers (300 miles) south of Cairo.
Amenhotep III inherited an empire that stretched from the Euphrates River in modern Iraq and Syria to Sudan and died around 1354 BC, ancient historians say.
He ruled for nearly four decades, a reign known for its opulence and the grandeur of its monuments, including the Colossi of Memnon — two massive stone statues near Luxor that represent him and his wife.
“It’s not only a city — we can see... economic activity, workshops and ovens,” Mostafa Waziri, head of the country’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, said Saturday.
Since the announcement, some scholars have disputed that Hawass and his team have succeeded where others had failed by locating the city.
Egyptologist Tarek Farag posted Friday on Facebook that the area was first excavated more than a century ago by a team from New York’s Metropolitan Museum.
But Waziri dismissed these concerns, saying previous digs had taken place further afield to the south the site.