Police ferret out illegals from hide-outs

Updated 08 November 2013

Police ferret out illegals from hide-outs

The Kingdom’s police and security agencies arrested 11,756 violators of residency and labor laws on the third day of the clampdown on illegal workers across the country, according to reports from Makkah, Jeddah, Al-Jouf, Northern Border Province, Renia, Dhahran Al-Janoub and Sajer.
Lt. Nawaf Al-Bouq, spokesman of Jeddah police, said officers raided the hide-outs of illegal workers, which detectives had earlier identified.
“The raids netted 3,918 persons on the first day, while 3,877 violators were arrested on the second day. The operations are continuing as planned,” he said.
He said the city’s detention center has been refurbished to hold large numbers of detainees of both sexes. “The detention facility has an unlimited capacity and is guarded by security on all sides. Medical, Civil Defense, first aid, utilities and humanitarian services are available around the clock.”
In a predawn raid Tuesday under the direct supervision of Riyadh’s Deputy Gov. Prince Turki bin Abdullah bin Abdulaziz, around 376 violators were nabbed in the Manfouha district.
The daylong raids resulted in the arrest of 818 illegal expatriates in Riyadh. The raids were conducted by officers of Riyadh police in the presence of the deputy governor on a special directive from Riyadh Gov. Prince Khalid bin Bandar bin Abdulaziz.
According to a spokesman of Riyadh police, the arrested foreigners were of different nationalities. Some of them were drunk or in possession of light weapons.
During the raid in Manfouha, police closed exit routes. The raid there began at 5:30 a.m. and lasted 90 minutes, he said, adding that women were among the detainees.
On Tuesday, Makkah police arrested 3,483 undocumented expatriates, said Col. Badar Al-Saud, spokesman of the city’s police.
He said officers apprehended 8,683 violators on the first and second days of the campaign. They are being held at the Al-Shumaisy General Service Center to record their biometric details and prepare them for deportation. Those who have criminal records would be handed over to police.
The director of police in Sajer said 75 unidentified or undocumented people were arrested in the town and nearby villages. They were from Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea. He said some were arrested while hiding in an underground petrol tank, while others turned themselves in when they saw police approaching.
Brig. Bandar Al-Eida, spokesman of the Northern Border Province, said officers arrested 93 violators on Wednesday. They now face legal action.
The spokesman of the Al-Jouf police said officers arrested 214 illegal workers in Sakaka and other parts of the province on the first two days of the campaign.
Brig. Obaid Al-Darami, director of Al-Jouf police, appealed to citizens to cooperate with the campaign and not shelter or employ undocumented foreigners. He also urged them to report illegal workers.
In Renia, 30 people were arrested in Janoub Al-Dahran on Wednesday, while 62 people were arrested over the first two days of the campaign, according to police sources.


Riyadh roads turn green as world’s largest urban greening project branches out

Based on experience, roads and streets without trees contain eight to 10 times the amount of dust compared with streets lined with trees on both sides. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 03 August 2020

Riyadh roads turn green as world’s largest urban greening project branches out

  • Capital gets a facelift as Vision 2030 program works to plant 7.5 million trees
  • Most of the tree species used in the project are from a well-developed local environment with low agricultural service and care

RIYADH: The Green Riyadh project, one of the world’s largest urban greening initiatives, is rapidly bearing fruit as it transforms main roads in the capital.

Major thoroughfares, including King Khalid, Makkah and King Salman roads, are getting a facelift as part of the Vision 2030 goal of improving quality of life in the city.
Dr. Fahad Al-Mana, a professor of Ornamental Plants, Gardens and Green Areas at King Saud University, told Arab News that native tree species being used for the project include Ziziphus spina-christi, Acacia gerrardii and Prosopis cineraria, commonly known as the ghaf tree.
According to Al-Mana, the trees can survive in harsh desert conditions and will grow without intensive agricultural care.
“Most of the tree species used in the planting of the Green Riyadh project are from a well-developed local environment with low agricultural service and care,” he said.
Environmental conditions in Riyadh were taken into account during the tree selection process. The species can grow to a large size in only three years.
“In some locations, they have moved large 3-year-old local trees that were taken care of in plant nurseries to new locations where they are growing successfully,” Al-Mana said.
Green Riyadh will increase the amount of greenery in the city and augment the green cover in the Saudi capital with the planting of 7.5 million trees around the city’s main features and facilities.
The project will reduce the average ambient temperature by 2 degrees Celsius and improve air quality, encouraging people to follow a healthier lifestyle by walking or cycling.

FASTFACTS

• The project will reduce the average ambient temperature by 2 degrees Celsius and improve air quality, encouraging people to follow a healthier lifestyle by walking or cycling.

• The project will maximize the use of recycled water in irrigation works by increasing usage from 90,000 cubic meters per day to more than 1 million cubic meters per day through the construction of a new recycled water network.

• Green space in the city will increase from 5 percent to 9 percent by 2030

“The aim of planting trees in the streets is to provide shade and moderate the temperature, especially in summer, which contributes to the purification of air and reduces environmental pollution by protecting the city from sand storms, winds and dust. In addition, it gives an aesthetic view and the element of nature enters the city and nearby structures,” said Al-Mana.
He added that trees, especially those planted in central street islands, must have long trunks and high branches to avoid hindering the movement of pedestrians and cars. The trunk must measure at least 3 to 4 meters and the size of the trees planted must be proportional to the width of the island.
Al-Mana said green space in the city will increase from 5 percent to 9 percent by 2030.
According to the Green Riyadh website, the project will maximize the use of recycled water in irrigation works by increasing usage from 90,000 cubic meters per
day to more than 1 million cubic meters per day through the construction of a new recycled water network.
Al-Mana said the Green Riyadh project will also reduce carbon dioxide and impurity levels in the city.
“Based on experience, roads and streets without trees contain eight to 10 times the amount of dust compared with streets lined with trees on both sides,” he said.