Middle East holds larger potential for private jets

Updated 14 November 2013

Middle East holds larger potential for private jets

A total of 672 new private jets were sold globally in 2012, a 3.4 percent drop from 2011 figures, according to General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA).
Overall, 11,261 private jets were registered for use in the United States and 7,997 in the rest of the world. Moreover, the United States makes up 49.7 percent of the global market for private jets; Europe 20.8 percent, Asia Pacific 11.8 percent, South America 11.6 percent, and Middle East and Africa (MEA) 6.1 percent.
These figures were highlighted by Private Jet Charter (PJC), one of the world’s largest independent private jet charter brokers, while unveiling ambitious plans to expand its market share in the Middle East and Europe.
Hugh Courtenay, founder and chief executive, PJC said: “The Middle East holds a larger potential for private jet business compared to other more developed regions, due mainly to the fact that the service industry in this region is still developing. We are pleased with the growing interest in our air charter services here, reinforcing our position as one of the Middle East’s leading private aircraft charter brokers.”
PJC has a network of offices in the UK, Nice and significant presence in the Middle East, through a busy base in Dubai and strong presence in Jeddah in Saudi Arabia. The organization also has offices in the key charter hubs of Moscow and Florida.”
Ross Kelly, MD for Middle East, PJC added: “With investments increasingly migrating to emerging markets, traditional business hubs are losing ground. PJC is proud of its strengths in these promising markets, backed by an unrivalled track record.”
PJC has become increasingly popular in recent years as more people choose to bypass security hassles and exasperating check-in procedures at airports by opting for a private jet. PJC has access to the largest and most comprehensive fleet of private jets anywhere in the world.
PJC has business clients who fly privately a regular basis, while there are others who book once or twice a year. The company’s client base is very varied — musicians, business people, moguls and wealthy individuals, actors or news reporters needing to get to a news flashpoint. The company also arranges flights for football teams, sports clubs, fashion designers and DJs.
Kelly said: “PJC’s business has been built over several years of listening to clients’ preferences. Our team has a passion for surpassing expectations and will go to great lengths to tailor each global jet to the client’s specific itinerary, timings and budget.”
PJC’s sophisticated state-of-the-art aircraft sourcing technology — computerized aircraft tracking system (CATS) — enables the company’s aviation consultants to source available aircraft at the click of a mouse, by aircraft type, number of seats, year of manufacture and from any location in the world.
Specific benefits that PJC offers its customers include 24-hour service around the year, multilingual and expert staff, competitive free quotations and advice, unique aircraft sourcing technology, flight watch monitoring on all executive air charter flights.
PJC is an ISO 9002-certified company with 23 years of leadership in the aviation field. It is a respected provider of VIP aircraft, executive jets, helicopter charter, corporate airliners and dedicated medical evacuation aircraft.


Aramco chief sees demand for oil staying above 100m barrels

Updated 23 January 2020

Aramco chief sees demand for oil staying above 100m barrels

  • A panel on the global energy outlook at the WEF in Davos heard that renewable energy alone would not be able to meet rising demand for power as more people moved into the middle class
  • The panel also heard that coal, not oil, remained the biggest source of carbon emissions

DAVOS: Aramco CEO Amin Nasser said he expected global oil demand to stay above the 100 million barrels threshold as the rise of the global middle class spurred demand for energy.
A panel on the global energy outlook at the World Economic Forum in Davos heard that renewable energy alone would not be able to meet rising demand for power as more people moved into the middle class.
“There will be additional demand and the only way to meet it is if you continue to provide affordable, reliable and viable energy to the rest of the world,” said the Aramco CEO.
“There is good penetration from renewables and electric cars are picking up however you need to consider what is happening in the world. There are still an additional 2 billion people coming. There are currently 3 billion people using biomass, animal dung, kerosene for cooking and there are 1 billion people today without electricity and almost 50 percent of people have never flown in an aeroplane.”
The panel heard that coal, not oil, remained the biggest source of carbon emissions but that the location of many coal-fired power plants in developing Asian economies meant that reducing its impact was a major challenge.
“The number one source of emissions by far is the coal fire power plants – they alone are responsible for one third of emissions,” said International Energy Agency Executive Director Fatih Birol. “But they are in many cases the number one source of electricity generation in low income countries - so this is not a black and white issue.”