High fuel consumption in factories under study

High fuel consumption in factories under study
Updated 06 December 2013

High fuel consumption in factories under study

High fuel consumption in factories under study

The Saudi Energy Efficiency Center (SEEC) is conducting a study to reduce the high fuel consumption in petrochemical, cement and metals factories in line with international benchmarks, an official said here on Wednesday.
Naif Al-Abadi, director general of the SEEC, said the plan is to raise fuel consumption efficiency on more than 120 production lines by 2030.
“The Saudi individual consumes three times the amount of electricity compared to international levels, but Saudi factories exceed global levels many times,” said Al-Abadi.
Al-Abadi was speaking to the press on the sidelines of the Saudi Water and Power Forum and International Exhibition that ended on Dec. 3 in Jeddah.
“The center conducted a global survey to define the best levels of energy consumption at an international level. The survey resulted in setting up a time frame for factories to reach a suitable level of fuel consumption by 2030,” he said.
He dismissed the notion that Saudis waste the country’s resources because a recent scientific study showed that more citizens were starting to use water and electricity sparingly.
“But our citizens need information and directions in this regard, with awareness campaigns on home appliances that consume more energy and others that save energy, and how to save fuel and energy in general,” he said.
The biggest challenge that the Kingdom faces in terms of fuel and energy efficiency and minimizing wastage is to check the specifications of all appliances and electrical devices on the country’s markets.
“We expect regulations in January that will ban the import of energy wasting appliances,” he said.
On another related issue, Adel Bushnaq, chairman of the exhibition, said that more than two thirds of Saudi Arabia’s population do not have access to proper sewage networks. “It costs more than SR200 billion to deliver fresh water to all areas of the Kingdom. It would cost the same to complete the country’s sewage networks,” said Bushnaq.
He warned that rising levels of water consumption in the country would see Saudi Arabia become as dry as parts of Africa, unless a strategic plan was put in place to preserve water resources. “Urban areas consume more than 2.5 billion tons of water a year, with an additional 1.5 billion tons for industrial purposes,” he said.
He urged government agencies to establish control and supervisory bodies to monitor water consumption in Riyadh, where some farms consume more than the rest of the country combined. In addition, he claimed that some farms in Tabuk and a factory in Madinah were poisoning underground water with hazardous waste.