Man kills four, self after family argument in Philippines

Updated 01 January 2014

Man kills four, self after family argument in Philippines

MANILA: A gun enthusiast held hostage three members of his family and their maid for 10 hours before killing them and committing suicide in the eastern Philippines, police said Wednesday.
Witnesses said Anthony Zepeda had argued with family members in their home in the town of Pili in Camarines Sur province on Tuesday, police said.
The confrontation later culminated in Zepeda taking hostage his father, brother, sister-in-law and the maid, provincial police chief Superintendent Romero Bausa said.
Bausa said police negotiators had tried to end the crisis peacefully, but Zepeda instead shot his captives and later committed suicide.
“The cadaver of the suspect was also found at the ground floor. He has a bullet wound in the head and there’s an indication that he shot himself,” Bausa said.
The nature of the argument that prompted the hostage taking remained unknown, but initial investigation showed that Zepeda had a history of drug abuse, police said.
Bausa said Zepeda was also a known gun enthusiast as was his father.
“The assumption was... that he was fully armed,” he said, explaining why police did not immediately assault the suspect’s home.
The killings underscored the need for stricter gun controls in the Philippines, where a thriving weapons black market makes it easy for anyone to buy unlicensed firearms.
In January last year, a drugs-crazed gunman armed with a semi-automatic weapon killed eight people in a shooting rampage in a town just south of Manila.
The killings had sparked a government drive against illegal firearms, although months later police said there remained a staggering more than half a million unlicensed guns in the hands of civilians in the country.


LIVE: Davos 2020 Day Two: Middle East geopolitics and more

Updated 3 min 32 sec ago

LIVE: Davos 2020 Day Two: Middle East geopolitics and more

  • The World Economic Forum runs until Jan. 24 in Davos, Switzerland

DAVOS, Switzerland: The World Economic Forum 2020 continues on Wednesday from Davos in Switzerland. Foreign ministers from the Middle East and North Africa are taking to the stage to talk about the geopolitical outlook in the region.

There will also be discussion panels on a range of topics including global financial markets, environment, science and technology.

Follow Arab News coverage here:

--

16:45 - The Wall Street Journal Editor Thorold Baker opens a discussion on the outlook for emerging markets this year. Saudi Arabia's Minister of Economy and Planning Mohammad Al-Tuwaijri is part of the panel, and he's joined by Alicia Ibarra from the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean; Economics professor Jin Keyu; and Standard Chartered Bank chief Bill Winters.

The Saudi minister mentioned the Kingdom's strides on "driving the non-oil growth." He emphasized the essesnce of Saudi Arabia's diversification model is to veer away from oil.

--

14:45 - Saudi Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman joins a discussion on the future of fossil fuels. Also on stage were Colombian Minister of Energy Maria Fernanda Suarez, President and Group Chief Executive Officer of PETRONAS Wan Zulkiflee Wan Ariffin, and Total chief Patrick Pouyanne.

Prince Abdulaziz reiterated the Kingdom's commitment to developing renewable energy, saying Saudi Arabia is involved in a "transfromative effort."

The officials talked about supply and demand of the oil market. (Screengrab/World Economic Forum)

--

13:00 - Alphabet Inc. and Google CEO Sundar Pichai takes to the stage to talk about Artificial Intelligence and its impacts on society.

--

12:00 - World Economic Forum President Borge Brende is moderating a panel discussion on the Middle East and North Africa. He is joined Turkey's Minister of Foreign Affairs Mevlut Cavusoglu, his Omani counterpart Yousuf Bin Alawi Bin Abdullah, Prime Minister of Jordan Omar Al Razzaz, and Jane Harman, the president of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

Jordan's Razzaz said the world has "to be very careful about the sorts of intervention, regional and global, that we do."

He added: "Jordan… has presented a model, that shows political and economic resilience."