Obesity ballooning in developing world

Updated 29 January 2014

Obesity ballooning in developing world

LONDON: The number of obese and overweight people in the developing world nearly quadrupled to almost a billion between 1980 and 2008, a think-tank report said Friday.
There are now far more obese or overweight adults in the developing world than in richer countries, the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) said.
The London-based institute said more than a third of all adults around the world — 1.46 billion people — were obese or overweight.
Between 1980 and 2008, the numbers of people affected in the developing world rose from 250 million to 904 million. In the developed world, the figure rose from 321 million to 557 million.
“The growing rates of overweight and obesity in developing countries are alarming,” said ODI research fellow Steve Wiggins, who co-authored the Future Diets report.
“On current trends, globally, we will see a huge increase in the number of people suffering certain types of cancer, diabetes, strokes and heart attacks, putting an enormous burden on public health care systems.” The report said overweight and obesity rates have almost doubled in China and Mexico since 1980, and risen by a third in South Africa.
The study said the rise in obesity was down to diets changing in developing countries where incomes were rising, with people shifting away from cereals and tubers to eating more meat, fats and sugar.
The over-consumption of food, coupled with increasingly sedentary lives, was also to blame.
The report said there seemed to be little will among the public and leaders to take action on influencing diet in the future.
“Governments have focused on public awareness campaigns, but evidence shows this is not enough,” said Wiggins.
“The lack of action stands in stark contrast to the concerted public actions taken to limit smoking in developed countries.
“Politicians need to be less shy about trying to influence what food ends up on our plates. The challenge is to make healthy diets viable whilst reducing the appeal of foods which carry a less certain nutritional value.”


Baby talk: Tips for mothers with teething babies

A baby’s toothbrush should be small. (Shutterstock)
Updated 14 November 2019

Baby talk: Tips for mothers with teething babies

DUBAI: It’s a happy event when the first tooth appears in the laughing little mouth and their teeth gradually start peeking out proudly and happily at the parents. To ask an obvious question: How should you choose your baby’s first toothbrush?

What specifications are suitable for your baby’s soft, fragile gums?

Among the helpful tips about choosing the toothbrush for your baby’s first teeth, we have compiled the following for you:

First, a baby’s toothbrush should be small, adapted to fit the little one’s mouth, and it should reach two of the baby’s teeth with each movement.

The most important specifications of the baby’s toothbrush are that it have smooth bristles arranged in three lines and a round head to protect the baby’s gums from injury.

It’s best if the bristles are industrially manufactured and not made of animal hair because the latter is hollow on the inside and can store a lot of germs.

The toothbrush can have sloped or straight bristles, according to the recommendation of your pediatrician, who will prefer one shape over the other based on your baby’s mouth shape and their ability to adapt to the brush.

It’s best to sometimes set aside two toothbrushes for the baby, one for the morning and the second for the evening, so that each has plenty of time to dry, preventing an accumulation of germs on them, or you can have one and place it in the open air after each use.

To distinguish between the morning brush and the evening brush, you can choose different colors, of course, knowing that toothbrushes made of nylon need more time to dry. It’s always best not to clean a baby’s teeth with a damp brush.

Replace your baby’s toothbrush every two months because it becomes damaged or warped from use, and the child’s gums could be injured by using it. It’s also better to replace it immediately after your child recovers from the flu or any other infectious disease.

Finally, and to help your little angel form the habit of brushing their teeth, choose a toothbrush decorated with funny faces from a cartoon they love or their favorite animal, if possible.

This article was first published on babyarabia.com.