Obesity ballooning in developing world

Updated 29 January 2014

Obesity ballooning in developing world

LONDON: The number of obese and overweight people in the developing world nearly quadrupled to almost a billion between 1980 and 2008, a think-tank report said Friday.
There are now far more obese or overweight adults in the developing world than in richer countries, the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) said.
The London-based institute said more than a third of all adults around the world — 1.46 billion people — were obese or overweight.
Between 1980 and 2008, the numbers of people affected in the developing world rose from 250 million to 904 million. In the developed world, the figure rose from 321 million to 557 million.
“The growing rates of overweight and obesity in developing countries are alarming,” said ODI research fellow Steve Wiggins, who co-authored the Future Diets report.
“On current trends, globally, we will see a huge increase in the number of people suffering certain types of cancer, diabetes, strokes and heart attacks, putting an enormous burden on public health care systems.” The report said overweight and obesity rates have almost doubled in China and Mexico since 1980, and risen by a third in South Africa.
The study said the rise in obesity was down to diets changing in developing countries where incomes were rising, with people shifting away from cereals and tubers to eating more meat, fats and sugar.
The over-consumption of food, coupled with increasingly sedentary lives, was also to blame.
The report said there seemed to be little will among the public and leaders to take action on influencing diet in the future.
“Governments have focused on public awareness campaigns, but evidence shows this is not enough,” said Wiggins.
“The lack of action stands in stark contrast to the concerted public actions taken to limit smoking in developed countries.
“Politicians need to be less shy about trying to influence what food ends up on our plates. The challenge is to make healthy diets viable whilst reducing the appeal of foods which carry a less certain nutritional value.”


What We Are Eating Today: Made Rustic

Updated 10 July 2020

What We Are Eating Today: Made Rustic

Made Rustic is a home-based Saudi business specializing in healthy snacks — both sweet and savory — that are free from artificial colors, additives and refined sugar.
Made Rustic offers a variety of artisanal dips, spreads, and crackers, as well as a range of flatbreads seasoned with traditional Middle Eastern combinations of herbs and spices, such as zaatar and sumac. Other toppings include rosemary, parmesan, kalamata olives, chili flakes, spicy cheddar, lemon and lavender.
Their signature product is the charcuterie board — or cheese and meat board — topped with an array of snacks, including crackers, breads, cheeses, seasonal fruit and veggies, meats, nuts, dips, and spreads.
The charcuterie board, with its attractive presentation and variety of options, is a sophisticated way to serve light morsels, whether at in-home parties or office gatherings.
Made Rustic’s platters are sure to make a good impression. They are customizable based on dietary needs; there is even a vegan option.
Made Rustic’s grazing platters come in two sizes: A medium platter for small gatherings of eight to 12 people and a large platter for more than 15 people.
A vegan customized grazing platter of your choice is also available. Prices range from SR25 ($7) to SR100. Products are available through @crate.ksa and @lugmety.