Prince Turki calls for UN resolution to pull out Shiites from Syria

Prince Turki calls for UN resolution to pull out Shiites from Syria
Updated 15 May 2014

Prince Turki calls for UN resolution to pull out Shiites from Syria

Prince Turki calls for UN resolution to pull out Shiites from Syria

DAVOS, Switzerland: Prince Turki Al-Faisal, chairman of King Faisal Center for Research and Islamic Studies, has criticized the US over its policy on Syria, and called for a UN resolution to pull “Iraqi and Lebanese Shiite militia” out of the country.
Prince Turki, a former intelligence chief, also said the world was disappointed with the “sense of no direction” in US foreign policy.
“I want the Americans to go to the Security Council and get a resolution that forces should be deployed to stop the fighting in Syria,” he told the World Economic Forum in Davos.
“If that is not available, then at least a humanitarian corridor to allow people not to starve.”
Prince Turki said Iraqi militia and Lebanese Hezbollah cadres outnumbered opposition forces fighting in Syria.
“You have to get these (Shiite) people out. The only way to do it is by a concerted international effort led by the US and supported by the US allies to force these people to stop the fighting.”
Prince Turki added: “On the Syria issue among other things, the (US) policy hasn’t been clear and definitely the actions have not been clear either. This disturbs America’s allies because we’ve grown to depend on America.”
“It is not just about Iran (and) Syria, it’s the sense of no direction,” he said. In Geneva, meanwhile, Haitham Al-Maleh, a senior member of the opposition, said there was not enough common ground for direct talks with the Syrian regime. The opposition has demanded Bashar Assad’s departure.
“The transition to a free Syria is the key to fighting terror,” said Oubai Shahbandar, a senior adviser to the Syrian opposition.
“We will be patient,” said Louay Safi, a coalition spokesman. “The negotiations are just starting.”
As the peace conference faltered, fighting raged throughout parts of Syria, including near Damascus.
Government forces bombed opposition areas in Aleppo, according to the British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and local activists.