Understanding the Iran-West detente

Understanding the Iran-West detente

Understanding the Iran-West detente
Almost every individual around the globe uses cell phone but few know about Coltan, a metallic ore, which is made into a component for many electronic devices like cell phones. Due to advancement in the digital technology, the demand of Coltan has skyrocketed.
Like many other minerals, it is found in abundance in Africa due to which, many countries in the Dark Continent have become cauldrons of chaos. A tug-of-war between various tribes over the control of these resources has resulted into deaths of hundreds. This is an ongoing phenomenon and hardly attracts media attention. Of course, this will affect the soaring business of global IT giants. I would like to share with my readers another interesting fact, in the war-torn Sudan a special kind of glue is produced that is used in Colas (do not wish to name the brand for obvious reasons).
You must be wondering why this writer is focusing on these mineral resources. The reason is most, if not all; conflicts in the world are a result of a race to gain control of the natural resources. There is an economic aspect of most, if not all, political conflicts. In this context, it would be easier to understand the changing position of Iran in the world. From an outlaw state that was about to be attacked last year to the most welcomed country at Davos, Iran has obviously something to offer to the world. Isn’t it interesting that all of a sudden American companies are all set to land in Tehran? Pure economics is at work.
Iranian President Hassan Rowhani commandeered the spotlight at Davos. He delivered a message of peaceful intentions and a desire to do business with all companies around the world. And business it is. And all of a sudden, being a nuclear power meant nothing to the Iranian leadership and Iran agreed to halt any further uranium enrichments. It is ironic that for the past 10 years, the whole word was on a collision course with Iran but in Davos the new Iranian path crisscrossed with not only the American or the West but also with Israel. The Americans and Israelis are no longer the Great Satan. The entire world appears to have forgotten Ahmadinejad’s threats to annihilate Israel. The reason behind this change of heart is Iran’s vast natural resources that to this day remain largely untapped.
Iran has oil, gas, caviar, saffron, rugs and most important Iranian youths who are craving for anything “Made in USA.” They want American music and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of Iranian in the United States who are happy and love the American way of life and they can work as a bridge between the two countries. And there are millions in Iran who still remember the good old days when Iran and America enjoyed strategic ties. At this stage, Iran’s most important energy infrastructure is old and outdated or damaged during the Iran-Iraq war.
The need for a massive moderation of the Iranian oilfields can bring not millions or billions to the American companies but it will bring trillions of dollars in the next few years. And to add to these trillions, the majority of Iranians want American cars and other commodities and gadgets. And with business transactions and economic deals, politics will change and center of political strategies will shift. And yes, Iran will see the positive changes of attitudes toward Iranian leadership and more political channels will open but at the same time Iran will have to adapt to those changes and must show a more positive attitude to the outside world, especially its neighbors.
Sooner or later, Iran will have to slam its doors open to the West. It must learn to mix business with the protocols of politics. One thing Iran is yet to realize is that it is the economic interest between nations that shapes up ties. And it is about time that the Iranians start thinking about their own country and must forget past dreams about spreading their “revolutionary” ideology. A final note to Iran, the Americans want to do business fast. In business they don’t like to wait. In other words, don’t take 444 days in signing a deal. It might remind the Americans of the 1979 hostage crisis. But with so much natural resources waiting to be explored, who would care about the plight of the 52 American hostages over three decades ago. After all it’s all about profits and business.

Email: [email protected]
Disclaimer: Views expressed by writers in this section are their own and do not necessarily reflect Arab News' point-of-view