Saudi youth need to expand career options

Updated 05 February 2014

Saudi youth need to expand career options

Saudis need to change their perception of certain professions in order to reduce reliance on expat workers in the long-run, many prominent businessmen have said.
Expanding the job search has been a dilemma for Saudi youth, as they refuse to take up certain jobs for fear of being looked down upon.
“It has been my experience in Saudi Arabia that young women and men do not know what their professional interests are, and so they take up any job they can find,” says Noura Al-Turki, HR and CSR executive manager at Nesma Holding Co. Ltd.
“When they are not satisfied with their experience, they often leave and remain unemployed for a long time.”
Al-Turki says that specialists need to work with youth to help them discover their interests and explore jobs that are fulfilling for them and not just to live up to society’s expectations.
“A recent study revealed that engaging in extensive self-development is the most successful method for getting and keeping a job and results in an 86-percent success rate in employment. We really need to help young Saudis discover their passions. When we do that, the taboos associated with certain jobs will definitely fade.”
The government recently took measures to attract Saudis to the private sector. Although the majority of Saudis remain dissatisfied with jobs available in the sector due to the long working hours and low pay, companies in the private sector need to hire Saudis to win government contracts.
According to employers, Saudi youth need to put in more effort in their jobs.
“It is very important for Saudi youth to expand their career options, as the market remains diverse and has many opportunities,” says Nouf Mohammad Al-Marwaai, director of Naturopathy Co. Ltd., a medical firm, and director of Nouf International Co. Ltd., a trade firm.
Al-Marwaai adds that expanding the industrial field through youth will add value to the market and enhance the local industry. “We need their creativity and productivity,” he said.
“I think that Saudi youth just need to give themselves a chance. Such jobs need hands-on experience to be able to derive immediate job satisfaction,” says Al-Marwaai.
“It is a different way to enhance productivity, which also gives them a chance to be creative and to change their environment. It helps them be involved in building their own country’s infrastructure and enhancing their knowledge instead of just supervising. This is one way of controlling quality and outcomes and reducing dependence on outside sources.”
Al-Marwaai says the Kingdom needs to educate youth on productivity and independence. “We need to teach them the beauty of productivity and the importance of creativity. Self-development and cognitive development are very important. Once they understand this, they will know the value of adding their effort and manpower to their own market and building their own country,” he said.


Riyadh roads turn green as world’s largest urban greening project branches out

Based on experience, roads and streets without trees contain eight to 10 times the amount of dust compared with streets lined with trees on both sides. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 03 August 2020

Riyadh roads turn green as world’s largest urban greening project branches out

  • Capital gets a facelift as Vision 2030 program works to plant 7.5 million trees
  • Most of the tree species used in the project are from a well-developed local environment with low agricultural service and care

RIYADH: The Green Riyadh project, one of the world’s largest urban greening initiatives, is rapidly bearing fruit as it transforms main roads in the capital.

Major thoroughfares, including King Khalid, Makkah and King Salman roads, are getting a facelift as part of the Vision 2030 goal of improving quality of life in the city.
Dr. Fahad Al-Mana, a professor of Ornamental Plants, Gardens and Green Areas at King Saud University, told Arab News that native tree species being used for the project include Ziziphus spina-christi, Acacia gerrardii and Prosopis cineraria, commonly known as the ghaf tree.
According to Al-Mana, the trees can survive in harsh desert conditions and will grow without intensive agricultural care.
“Most of the tree species used in the planting of the Green Riyadh project are from a well-developed local environment with low agricultural service and care,” he said.
Environmental conditions in Riyadh were taken into account during the tree selection process. The species can grow to a large size in only three years.
“In some locations, they have moved large 3-year-old local trees that were taken care of in plant nurseries to new locations where they are growing successfully,” Al-Mana said.
Green Riyadh will increase the amount of greenery in the city and augment the green cover in the Saudi capital with the planting of 7.5 million trees around the city’s main features and facilities.
The project will reduce the average ambient temperature by 2 degrees Celsius and improve air quality, encouraging people to follow a healthier lifestyle by walking or cycling.

FASTFACTS

• The project will reduce the average ambient temperature by 2 degrees Celsius and improve air quality, encouraging people to follow a healthier lifestyle by walking or cycling.

• The project will maximize the use of recycled water in irrigation works by increasing usage from 90,000 cubic meters per day to more than 1 million cubic meters per day through the construction of a new recycled water network.

• Green space in the city will increase from 5 percent to 9 percent by 2030

“The aim of planting trees in the streets is to provide shade and moderate the temperature, especially in summer, which contributes to the purification of air and reduces environmental pollution by protecting the city from sand storms, winds and dust. In addition, it gives an aesthetic view and the element of nature enters the city and nearby structures,” said Al-Mana.
He added that trees, especially those planted in central street islands, must have long trunks and high branches to avoid hindering the movement of pedestrians and cars. The trunk must measure at least 3 to 4 meters and the size of the trees planted must be proportional to the width of the island.
Al-Mana said green space in the city will increase from 5 percent to 9 percent by 2030.
According to the Green Riyadh website, the project will maximize the use of recycled water in irrigation works by increasing usage from 90,000 cubic meters per
day to more than 1 million cubic meters per day through the construction of a new recycled water network.
Al-Mana said the Green Riyadh project will also reduce carbon dioxide and impurity levels in the city.
“Based on experience, roads and streets without trees contain eight to 10 times the amount of dust compared with streets lined with trees on both sides,” he said.