Trilingual society key feature of action plan

Updated 04 February 2014

Trilingual society key feature of action plan

The anniversary of the 66th Independence Day of Sri Lanka is an opportune moment for us to reflect with a sense of satisfaction on the many accomplishments the country has achieved within a brief span of time.
As a country, we are proud of the significant progress that has been made since the defeat of terrorism four years ago, and our people are enjoying peace in a united Sri Lanka.
During the past several years, an extraordinary development drive has been undertaken by the government.
Numerous mega development programs are being implemented with the construction of harbors, airports and roads, bringing economic development to rural areas and connecting them to the larger economic development of the country.
The government is committed to ensuring that the opportunities gained by society as a result of these developments are available to all communities, across the country, for the upliftment and betterment of their lives.
In the Northern Province, free elections have been held after many years; bringing communities into the political process for the first time; internally displaced people have been able to return to their homes and have been reunited with their families; and fishing, agriculture, and a multitude of other industries have been reinvigorated to provide livelihood opportunities for people.
The National Action Plan and the recommendations of the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission are being implemented steadily and substantial resources are being allocated to ensure their objectives. A national policy is underway to transform the country into a trilingual society.
The policy framework of the Government, “Mahinda Chintana: Vision for the future”, is steadfast in guiding our development efforts and harnessing the tremendous potential of Sri Lanka, and is helping to revolutionize the country to emerge as a regional hub in aviation, commerce, maritime affairs and knowledge.
With these developments, increasing linkages and strong growth; Sri Lanka is a world class travel destination poised to move toward being an upper middle income country. The climate of peace and stability which is now prevailing in the country is an essential condition for this enhanced economic activity.
Sri Lanka continues to have a strong vibrant foreign policy and healthy relations in the global arena, guided by principles of nonalignment and friendship with all.
We are steadily expanding our diplomatic relations with a large number of countries and opening new diplomatic missions in different parts of the globe; deepening our ties of friendship amongst the international community of nations.
On the international stage, Sri Lanka hosted the 23rd Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in November 2013 and will serve as the Chair in Office of the Commonwealth for the next two years.
This significant event was a great opportunity for world leaders to see the tremendous progress and unprecedented post-conflict developments taking place in Sri Lanka.
At this time, I express my gratitude to the expatriate Sri Lankan community that has continued to contribute to the economic and social development of the country.
On the occasion of our National Day, let us rededicate ourselves to intensify collectively our commitment toward supporting our motherland in our challenges ahead, in order to lead the country toward a brighter future.

Prof. G.L. Peiris
Minister of External Affairs


General Motors and workers union contract expires, increases risk of strike

Updated 38 min 11 sec ago

General Motors and workers union contract expires, increases risk of strike

  • Union officials told General Motors they would let the contract lapse just before midnight Saturday
  • A strike by 49,200 union workers would bring to a halt GM’s US production

DETROIT: The four-year contract between General Motors and the United Auto Workers has expired as negotiations on a new deal continue.
Union officials told GM they would let the contract lapse just before midnight Saturday, increasing the risk of a strike as early as Sunday night. Union members working Sunday were to report as scheduled.
But there was a wrinkle. About 850 UAW-represented janitors who work for Aramark, a separate company, went on strike Sunday after working under an extended contract since March of 2018, the union said.
The strike covered eight GM facilities in Ohio and Michigan. Although UAW workers at GM are supposed to work, it wasn’t clear early Sunday whether the rank-and-file would cross their own union’s picket lines. GM said in a statement that it has contingency plans for any disruptions from the Aramark strike.
UAW Vice President Terry Dittes said in a letter to members that, after months of bargaining, both the union and GM are far apart on issues such as wages, health care, temporary employees, job security and profit-sharing.
The union’s executive leaders and a larger group of plant-level officials will meet Sunday morning to decide the union’s next steps.
The letter to members and another one to GM were aimed at turning up the pressure on GM negotiators.
“While we are fighting for better wages, affordable quality health care, and job security, GM refuses to put hard working Americans ahead of their record profits,” Dittes, the union’s chief bargainer with GM, said in a statement Saturday night.
Kristin Dziczek, vice president of the Center for Automotive Research, an industry think tank, said the union could strike at GM after the contract expires.
“If they’re not extending the agreement, then that would leave them open to strike,” she said.
But GM, in a statement Saturday night, still held out hope for an agreement, saying it continues to work on solutions.
“We are prepared to negotiate around the clock because there are thousands of GM families and their communities — and many thousands more at our dealerships and suppliers — counting on us for their livelihood. Our goal remains on building a strong future for our employees and our business,” the GM statement said.
A strike by 49,200 union workers would bring to a halt GM’s US production, and would likely stop the company from making vehicles in Canada and Mexico as well. That would mean fewer vehicles for consumers to choose from on dealer lots, and it would make it impossible to build specially ordered cars and trucks.
The union’s executive board was to meet early Sunday to talk about the union’s next steps, followed by a meeting in Detroit of plant-level union leaders from all over the country. An announcement was scheduled for after the meetings end.
If there is a strike, it would be the union’s first since a two-day work stoppage at GM in 2007.
The move by the union also comes as it faces an internal struggle over a federal corruption investigation that has touched its president, Gary Jones. Some union members are calling for Jones to step down while the investigation continues. But Friday night, union leaders did not remove Jones.
Union officials surely will face questions about the expanding investigation that snared a top official on Thursday. Vance Pearson, head of a regional office based near St. Louis, was charged with corruption in an alleged scheme to embezzle union money and spend cash on premium booze, golf clubs, cigars and swanky stays in California. It’s the same region that Jones led before taking the union’s top office last year. Jones has not been charged.
On Friday, union leaders extended contracts with Ford and Fiat Chrysler indefinitely, but the pact with General Motors was still set to expire Saturday night.
The union has picked GM, which is more profitable than Ford and Fiat Chrysler, as the target company, meaning it’s the focus of bargaining and would be the first company to face a walkout. Picket line schedules already have been posted near the entrance to one local UAW office in Detroit.
Talks between the union and GM were tense from the start, largely because GM plans to close four US factories. The union has promised to fight the closures.