Expats from 200 nations find KSA an ideal place to work

Expats from 200 nations find KSA an ideal place to work
Updated 16 March 2014

Expats from 200 nations find KSA an ideal place to work

Expats from 200 nations find KSA an ideal place to work

A Canadian professor at the Riyadh-based King Saud University (KSU) told Arab News Saturday that Saudi Arabia feeds, houses and ensures the safety of millions of expatriates.
Mirza Baig, who works in agricultural extension and rural development at KSU, was reacting to the prevalent stigmatization of the Kingdom on social media outlets.
In an exclusive interview, Baig, who has been working in the country for more than four years, said Saudi Arabia is an ideal country that ensures peace and security for all its inhabitants while providing extensive facilities for expatriates, including Western expats.
“Some of my acquaintances help spread false propaganda on Saudi laws,” said Baig, who is also an active environmental advocate under SPMUDA International.
He said: “Saudi courts operate independently from the country’s rulers. They punish culprits according to Islamic law. They give everyone a chance to prove themselves innocent.”
According to him, residents in the Kingdom are treated equally regardless of color, race and religion.
“We foreigners must be thankful to the rulers of Saudi Arabia and salute the courts that have ensured our safety,” he said.
“We expats must love this great country that is a fruit basket for about 200 nations of the world,” he said.
He said such levels of safety are not guaranteed in many other countries. “Saudi Arabia ranks number one in humanitarian initiatives,” the scientist said.
Baig said: “Saudi Arabia is a country that makes every possible effort to provide the basic necessities not only to its own citizens, but to those in need. The Kingdom routinely sends food, blankets, tents, shelters, clothing, medicine and doctors to disaster-hit areas. The Kingdom’s relief activities are unique and exemplary,” he elaborated.
The professor said Saudis are a peace-loving people who hate physical violence.
“There is no street crime in the country. People enjoy a simple and rural lifestyle. There are hardly any cases of stealing or theft,” he said.
“I believe three factors explain this. First, Islam strictly prohibits such activities and Islamic teachings have become the part of Saudis’ personas regardless of age, economic class and educational level. Second, Islamic laws are fully implemented. Lastly, the Kingdom has taken measures to provide basic necessities to both Saudi and non-Saudi residents either for free or on highly subsidized rates at the doorsteps,” he said.
“Robbery and burglary are foreign terms to Saudis,” he said.
Baig said free education and scholarships are available to anyone regardless of origin, color or race, with plenty of opportunities for those who want to study abroad to seek higher education in technically advanced countries.
“They have employment guaranteed after they graduate,” he said.