Kingdom to allocate SR67bn for saline water projects

Kingdom to allocate SR67bn for saline water projects
Updated 04 March 2014

Kingdom to allocate SR67bn for saline water projects

Kingdom to allocate SR67bn for saline water projects

Saudi Arabia plans to allocate some SR67 billion toward the building of water desalination plants by 2020 in a bid to meet the rising demand of consumers, Asharq Al-Awsat daily said.
In this regard, Saline Water Conversion Corporation (SWCC) Gov. Abdulrahman bin Mohamed Al-Ibrahim has stressed the importance of building highly-efficient and less-fuel consuming water projects.
The desalination water plants in the Kingdom is the second largest fuel consuming sector using up to 300,000 barrels of oil a day. “It is a matter of grave concern for the experts at the SWCC and nationwide,” the media said.
The SWCC chief said the Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources, the Ministry of Water and Electricity, and the Ministry of Finance are set to launch a series of highly fuel-efficient water and power projects.
This drive will raise the efficiency of the newly-approved plants to 70 percent as is the case with the projects currently being implemented in Ras Al-Khair and Yanbu, he said.
Mohamed Al-Ghamdi, SWCC deputy governor for operations and maintenance, said the SWCC had invested SR4 billion ($1.07 billion) in the rehabilitation of the existing water saline projects, which has extended their life span by 10 years.
Saudi Arabia has been producing roughly 20 percent of the world’s total saline water production. The SWCC covers 60 percent of the Kingdom’s total water needs through its plants spread over the eastern and western coasts of the Kingdom, he added.
Al-Ghamdi said the SWCC has entered into partnerships with the private sector through two mega projects — the Shuaiba water and electricity project and the Shaqiq Plant to produce nearly one million cubic meter desalinated water.
The SWCC has carried out three renovation plans for a period of five years each. The plans were implemented in 2000 and are expected to finish in 2015, where the renovation efforts will increase the life span of the plants to more than 15 years, he pointed out.