NCB Capital appoints Sarah Al-Suhaimi as CEO

Updated 04 March 2014

NCB Capital appoints Sarah Al-Suhaimi as CEO

NCB Capital, a major Saudi investment bank and the Kingdom's “largest asset manager,” has appointed Sarah Al-Suhaimi as CEO and member of the board subject to CMA (Capital Market Authority) approval. Tariq Linjawi, who had been acting CEO, is leaving the firm having successfully managed the organization through a transition period.
Al-Suhaimi joins, following CMA approval, from Jadwa Investment where she was head of asset management and CIO, managing over SR17 billion of assets in public and private equity, real estate and fixed income. Having joined Jadwa in 2007, she was previously head of portfolio management and prior to that had spent five years at Samba Financial Group, where she played a senior role in their asset management team managing high-net worth and institutional portfolios.
Commenting on her appointment, Mansour Al-Maiman, chairman of NCB Capital, said: "Sarah is a highly-experienced investment professional, with a proven track record of successful leadership in the industry. She has played a pivotal role in launching award-winning funds and growing asset management businesses. We are delighted that she is joining us. We would also like to thank Tariq Linjawi for his commitment to managing the firm through a period of transition."
Sarah is the vice chairperson of the advisory committee to the CMA and is a graduate of King Saud University, with a Bachelor of Administrative Science degree in accounting.
NCB Capital is described as the largest asset manager in Saudi Arabia, with SR46 billion ($12 billion) and offers its client the full range of investment services, including award-winning funds. It was recently voted No. 1 in economic research and in five sectors by Euromoney and also Wealth Manager of the Year by Global Investor magazine.


Apple, Google drop Fortnite from app stores over payments

Updated 14 August 2020

Apple, Google drop Fortnite from app stores over payments

  • Google said Fortnite will remain available on Android, just not through its app store
  • Apple and Google both take a 30% cut from in-app revenue purchases in games

NEW YORK: Apple and Google dropped the popular game Fortnite from their app stores after the game’s developer introduced a direct payment plan that bypasses their platforms.
Apple and Google both take a 30% cut from in-app revenue purchases in games, which has long been a sore spot with developers.
Fortnite is free, but users can pay for in game accoutrements like weapons and skins. Its developer, Epic Games, said in a blog post Thursday that it was introducing Epic Direct payments, a direct payment plan for Apple’s iOS and Google Play. Epic said the system is the same payment system it already uses to process payments on PC and Mac computers and Android phones.
Apple and Google said the service violates their guidelines.
“Epic enabled a feature in its app which was not reviewed or approved by Apple, and they did so with the express intent of violating the App Store guidelines regarding in-app payments that apply to every developer who sells digital goods or services,” Apple said in statement.
Google said Fortnite will remain available on Android, just not through its app store. Android users can download the app from other app stores, although that’s generally not an option for iPhone users.
Epic Games did not immediately return a request for comment. Epic’s Fortnite Twitter account said the company would debut a new short film called “Nineteen Eighty-Fortnite,” a seeming parody of Apple’s iconic “1984” commercial that introduced the Macintosh computer. It has also filed a complaint against Apple in the US District Court in Northern California for dropping Fortnite.