KSA, EU to draw out joint plan to help Syrian refugees

Updated 03 May 2014

KSA, EU to draw out joint plan to help Syrian refugees

The Kingdom and the European Union plan to develop a joint strategy to improve humanitarian aid to Syrian refugees.
The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) would send a special team to Brussels to discuss ways to help displaced people in affected countries, said Kristalina Georgieva, European commissioner for international cooperation, humanitarian aid and crisis response, who was on a day's visit to the capital.
She told Arab News that the Syrian refugee problem was the most serious humanitarian emergency in the past 10 years.
Georgieva held talks with Crown Prince Salman, deputy premier and minister of defense, Yusuf Al-Basam, vice chairman of the Saudi Fund for Development (SFD), and officials from the GCC General Secretariat.
“The Syrian war is expected to lead to the world’s largest refugee crisis surpassing Afghanistan, which has had the highest number of refugees for the past two decades,” she said.
The three-year conflict has affected about 10 million people, with 6.5 million displaced inside Syria and over 2.5 million in neighboring countries.
Georgieva had on Tuesday attended an international meeting in Dubai focusing on humanitarian issues and women. The meeting looked at various ways to help women including providing jobs, security, training and funding for businesses.
She said Syria's elderly, women and children were the most vulnerable victims of the war. Over 250,000 Syrians have lost their lives, with civilians making up two-thirds of this total. She said a further 250,000 Syrians, from both sides of the divide, are trapped in besieged areas.




Almost 5.5 million children, of whom 1.2 million are refugees, have been affected by the war.
She said that European countries have spent $3.5 billion over the past three years to help Syria's refugees. A total of $1.2 billion has been allocated for this year.


Foreign missions in Saudi Arabia visit Shaybah oil field 

The ambassadors and their families visited the oil field’s protected area. (SPA)
Updated 1 min 45 sec ago

Foreign missions in Saudi Arabia visit Shaybah oil field 

  • The dean of the diplomatic corps, Ambassador of Djibouti to Saudi Arabia Diaa-Eddin Saed Bamakhrama, thanked the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Saudi Aramco for the visit

RIYADH: Ambassadors and delegations to Saudi Arabia recently visited the Shaybah oil field in the Empty Quarter desert, the Saudi Press Agency reported.
The visit was designed to acquaint diplomatic delegations with one of the largest crude oil fields in the world, which has been vital for global supply.
The ambassadors and their families visited the oil field’s protected area, which has a herd of Arabian oryx and ostriches, enjoyed views of sand dunes and hiked in the natural areas.
The dean of the diplomatic corps, Ambassador of Djibouti to Saudi Arabia Diaa-Eddin Saed Bamakhrama, thanked the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Saudi Aramco for the visit, hailing the ability of the Kingdom to manage giant crude oil fields in difficult terrain.
Polish Ambassador to Saudi Arabia Jan Stanislaw Bury said that Shaybah oil field is an important economic center.
Shaybah is a major crude oil site in Saudi Arabia. It is one of the largest in the Kingdom with a crude reserve of nearly 14.3 billion barrels and gas reserve of nearly 25 trillion cubic feet.
Rub Al-Khali, also known as the Empty Quarter, is part of the larger Arabian Desert, covering 650,000 square kilometers in Saudi Arabia, Oman, the UAE and Yemen.