Human trafficking cases decrease in the UAE

Updated 16 April 2014

Human trafficking cases decrease in the UAE

The number of human trafficking cases in the UAE has come down significantly over the years, according Dr. Anwar Mohammed Gargash, minister of State for Foreign Affairs, minister of State for FNC Affairs and chairman of the National Committee to Combat Human Trafficking.
The UAE has achieved progress in the fight against human trafficking and will remain proactively engaged in the global campaign against the challenges of such constantly evolving crimes, Dr. Anwar Mohammed Gargash added in a speech at the launch of the Committee's Annual Report 2013-2014.
"We are happy to release the seventh annual report of this key government initiative against human trafficking as part of the Committee's efforts to share information on this critical issue with the general public and the international community," Gargash added.
According to the National Committee to Combat Human Trafficking, 27 human trafficking-related cases were registered last year, out of which the Public Prosecution treated 19 as human trafficking cases. These cases involved 24 victims and led to the arrest of 50 traffickers. Compared to these 19 cases in 2013, there were 58 cases in 2010 and 47 in 2012.
Notably, the U.A.E. has also recorded a high conviction rate with 12 cases convicted in 2013, involving stiff penalties ranging from one year in jail to life imprisonment and fines, reflecting the robustness of the judicial system in the U.A.E.
The UAE took several significant steps during the last year, which included amending Federal Law No. 51 to ensure better protection for victims, establishing a fund to support victims of human trafficking, proactively opening a new shelter in Abu Dhabi to deal with male victims of human trafficking, conducting a public awareness campaign at various terminals of the Dubai International Airport, and forging international partnerships and enhancing cooperation with the countries of origin to tackle the crime at source.


Iran scientist linked to military nuclear program killed

Updated 20 min 46 sec ago

Iran scientist linked to military nuclear program killed

  • Fakhrizadeh led Iran's so-called “Amad,” or “Hope” program
  • Israel and the West have alleged it was a military operation looking at the feasibility of building a nuclear weapon in Iran

DUBAI: An Iranian scientist that Israel alleged led the Islamic Republic's military nuclear program until its disbanding in the early 2000s was “assassinated” Friday, state television said.
Israel declined to immediately comment on the killing of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, who Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu once called out in a news conference saying: “Remember that name.” Israel has long been suspected of carrying out a series of targeted killings of Iranian nuclear scientists nearly a decade ago.
State TV Friday cited sources confirming the death. It said it would offer more information shortly.
The semiofficial Fars news agency, believed to be close to the country's Revolutionary Guard, said the attack happened in Absard, a small city just east of the capital, Tehran. It said witnesses heard the sound of an explosion and then machine gun fire. The attack targeted a car that Fakhrizadeh was in, the agency said.
Those wounded, including Fakhrizadeh's bodyguards, were later taken to a local hospital, the agency said.
State television on its website later published a photograph of security forces blocking off the road. Photos and video shared online showed a Nissan sedan with bullet holes through windshield and blood pooled on the road.
No group immediately claimed responsibility for the attack. However, Iranian media all noted the interest that Netanyahu had previously shown in Fakhrizadeh.
Fakhrizadeh led Iran's so-called “Amad,” or “Hope” program. Israel and the West have alleged it was a military operation looking at the feasibility of building a nuclear weapon in Iran. Tehran long has maintained its nuclear program is peaceful.
The International Atomic Energy Agency says that “Amad” program ended in the early 2000s. IAEA inspectors now monitor Iranian nuclear sites as part of Iran's now-unraveling nuclear deal with world powers.