Only pharmacies may sell energy drinks

Updated 24 May 2014

Only pharmacies may sell energy drinks

The Kingdom’s Consumer Protection Society is preparing a proposal to demand limiting the sales of energy drinks to pharmacies and to customers above the age of 18.
Society Chairman Nasir Al-Tuwaim said: “We drafted this proposal two days ago to limit the sale of these drinks to pharmacies and to consumers only over 18 years old.”
The drinks are in high demand by teenagers and young men who are often exposed to the harmful effects of the beverages. “Some people have died of addiction to these drinks,” Al-Tuwaim added.
Explaining the downside of the energy drinks, he said that consumers often mix them with alcohol to create a deadly potion which build up toxins in the body and might lead to kidney failure or even death.
“People at high risk of danger from these drinks are students or fitness enthusiasts who develop an addiction for them while trying to stay up late during exams or to enhance their performance in sports,” he added.
He pointed out that like smoking which has not been banned in the Kingdom despite its harmful effects, energy drinks are equally popular. “We are trying to build awareness among youngsters so they stop buying the stuff. This is the best way to counter the sale of the drinks and their harmful effects,” Al-Tuwaim underlined.
The Council of Ministers has announced its intention to stop advertising energy drinks through all the media. Earlier, it banned energy drink companies, its sales representatives and marketing staff from sponsoring sports, social or cultural events, or carrying out any activity to promote these drinks.


British royal Meghan speaks about miscarriage in New York Times article

Updated 25 November 2020

British royal Meghan speaks about miscarriage in New York Times article

  • ‘Losing a child means carrying an almost unbearable grief, experienced by many but talked about by few’

LONDON: Meghan, Britain’s Duchess of Sussex, has revealed that she had a miscarriage, an extraordinarily personal disclosure coming from a high-profile British royal.
The wife of Prince Harry and former actress wrote about the experience in detail in an opinion article published in the New York Times on Wednesday, saying that it took place one July morning when she was caring for Archie, the couple’s son.
“I knew, as I clutched my firstborn child, that I was losing my second,” Meghan wrote.
“Losing a child means carrying an almost unbearable grief, experienced by many but talked about by few.
“In the pain of our loss, my husband and I discovered that in a room of 100 women, 10 to 20 of them will have suffered from miscarriage. Yet despite the staggering commonality of this pain, the conversation remains taboo, riddled with (unwarranted) shame, and perpetuating a cycle of solitary mourning.”
The intimate details shared in the article are strikingly at odds with the usual policy of senior members of the British royal family, who reveal almost nothing about their personal lives.
Harry’s grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, has never discussed her private life in any media interview in her 68-year reign.
Meghan and Harry stepped back from royal duties and moved to the United States earlier this year. They have been trying to forge a new role for themselves outside the constraints of life in Britain’s strictly codified royal bubble.