Prison and lashes for malicious litigants

Updated 11 June 2014

Prison and lashes for malicious litigants

The Ministry of Justice plans to introduce tough new legislation to penalize malicious litigants, which would include fines, prison and lashes.
The plan aims to reduce case backlogs at the country’s courts and save the state from pumping more money into its free legal services program.
The ministry believes that the new law would reduce the number of malicious lawsuits. Judges would be given the discretion to throw out frivolous cases.
Sheik Muhammad Ameen Merdad, a member of the Supreme Judicial Council and chairman of the ministerial committee drafting the legislation, told local media recently that the new rules would save judges time and prevent disputes between Saudi individuals and communities.
Merdad said the project would be completed soon. He said the ministry was constantly reviewing the country’s legislation to develop the judiciary, in line with the orders and aspirations of Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah.
Lawyers and experts have welcomed the decision.
“This is a very important step toward limiting this phenomenon of malicious lawsuits,” said Majid Muhammad Qarroub, a lawyer and legal councilor at the ministry and the secretary general of the International Union of Lawyers.
He said the country’s provision of free legal advice has resulted in an increase in malicious lawsuits in the Kingdom.
Abdullah Marie bin Mahfooz, a lawyer and head of the National Committee for the Care of Prisoners and their Families, said such lawsuits harm prisoners and their families socially and psychologically. He said Article Three of the proposed amendments stipulates that the court can dismiss a case it considers to be malicious.
According to Wikipedia, malicious or vexatious litigation “is legal action which is brought, regardless of its merits, solely to harass or subdue an adversary. It may take the form of a primary frivolous lawsuit, or may be repetitive, burdensome, and unwarranted filing of meritless motions. Filing vexatious litigation is considered an abuse of the judicial process ...”


Third Saudi aid plane arrives in Beirut

KSRelief aircraft contains medical supplies, ventilators and other relief goods for blast victims. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 09 August 2020

Third Saudi aid plane arrives in Beirut

  • KSRelief teams are also active in treating blast victims

RIYADH: A third King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) plane loaded with aid arrived in Beirut on Saturday as part of a relief air bridge that was set up to help the people in wake of the Beirut blasts.

The air bridge was established on the directives of King Salman to provide urgent humanitarian aid to Lebanon.
KSRelief Adviser Dr. Ali bin Hamed Al-Ghamdi said the third plane is loaded with ventilators, hospital and medical equipment, as well as various medicines and disinfectants. It also contains food, tents, mattresses, blankets and cooking supplies.
So far, 200 tons of aid from the Kingdom have been flown to Lebanon with specialized teams to follow up and supervise the distribution operations.
KSRelief teams are also active in Lebanon in treating victims of the blast.
Earlier, two Saudi aircraft carrying more than 120 tons of medicines, equipment, and emergency supplies were dispatched to Beirut.
KSRelief Supervisor General Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah said in a statement that the assistance highlights the pivotal role of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in providing humanitarian assistance to all people in need around the world with complete impartiality.

The Saudi aid will help alleviate the sufferings of Lebanese people.

Maj. Gen. Mohammad Khair, Chief of the High Relief, Commission in Lebanon

The twin blasts devastated large areas of the Lebanese capital and destroyed vital infrastructure, including grain storage silos and port facilities.
Lebanon, already reeling from an economic and currency collapse, now faces the threat of food shortages and a major hit to exports and imports.
Countries around the world have rushed to help Lebanon in the wake of the port explosion on Aug. 4.
The secretary-general of the High Relief Commission in Lebanon, Maj. Gen. Mohammad Khair, thanked the Kingdom for the urgent humanitarian aid provided through KSRelief.
In a press statement, he praised the historical relations between the two countries, noting the Saudi aid will help alleviate the suffering of Lebanese people.
Residents in the Kingdom can also help Lebanon by making donations through KSRelief’s website.