US top court declines to hear Sept. 11 case against banks

Updated 01 July 2014

US top court declines to hear Sept. 11 case against banks

WASHINGTON: The US Supreme Court on Monday left intact a lower court ruling that barred victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks in New York from pursuing claims against banks they accused of indirectly helping militants.
The high court rejected an appeal filed by the victims following an April 2013 ruling by the 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals that complaints against banks and entities accused of indirectly aiding the perpetrators could be dismissed. Those victims included family members of nearly 3,000 people who died in the attacks that destroyed the World Trade Center.
The bank defendants dismissed by the ruling include Al Rajhi Bank, Dar Al-Maal Al-Islami Trust, Dallah Al Baraka Group LLC and Saudi American Bank, now known as Samba Financial Group. Separately, the appeals court also dismissed several individuals and companies from the case.

The appeals court said allegations against the banks over material support for terrorism could go ahead if there was a more direct relationship between the bank and a particular militant action.
The case before the high court is just one element of the multi-district litigation filed by victims against a wide range of defendants. The attacks were orchestrated by Osama Bin Laden under the auspices of the Al-Qaeda militant group. The US military killed Bin Laden in Pakistan in 2011.
The administration of President Barack Obama urged the court not to take the case.
The case is In re: Terrorist Attacks on September 11, 2001, US Supreme Court, 13-318.
In a related case, the court declined to hear an appeal filed by Saudi Arabia’s government objecting to a lower court decision to revise the Sept. 11 victims’ lawsuit against it for alleged links with the attacks. The case is Saudi Arabia v. Federal Insurance Company, et al, US Supreme Court, No. 13-1146.


Most licenses valid for Pakistan pilots working abroad: Regulator

Updated 1 min 44 sec ago

Most licenses valid for Pakistan pilots working abroad: Regulator

KARACHI: Pakistani authorities said Thursday they had confirmed the credentials of almost all Pakistani pilots working for foreign airlines, as the country battles a scandal over aviator licenses.
Airlines in 10 countries had demanded proof of valid flying licenses for their Pakistani pilots after it emerged about a third of Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) aviators were holding “bogus or suspicious” licenses.
In all, the foreign airlines asked for proof of 176 Pakistani pilot licenses.
Of these, 166 “have been validated as genuine and certified by the CAA (Civil Aviation Authority) Pakistan as having no anomaly,” the agency said in a statement.
The “process for the remaining 10 shall be concluded by next week,” it added.
Pakistan’s aviation minister sent shockwaves through the industry last month by revealing that some 260 pilots had dubious licenses.
About 150 worked for state-owned PIA — almost one-third of the airline’s staff of 434 pilots.
The announcement came a month after a PIA plane crashed into houses in Karachi, killing 98 people.
Investigators have largely blamed the crash on the pilots, though both had valid licenses.
The 10 airlines asking for proof of valid Pakistani pilots’ licenses were from Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, Oman, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Turkey, Malaysia, Vietnam and Hong Kong, according to the CAA.