The art of healing body and mind

The art of healing body and mind
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The art of healing body and mind
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Updated 24 December 2014

The art of healing body and mind

The art of healing body and mind

Although this guide was published a decade ago, it is one of the best I have come across. It offers an excellent introduction to Pilates, yoga, meditation and stress relief techniques which help us unwind, increase our vitality, find serenity, and get the best out of every day.
Pilates is a system of exercises developed in the 1920s by a German, Joseph H. Pilates, hence its name. The good thing about Pilates is that you do not have to be an athlete to do it. The exercises are gentle and designed to put as little strain on the body as possible. This means that whether you are young or elderly, a fitness fanatic or someone who hasn’t exercised for years, you can benefit from Pilates. You do not need equipment either, you can practice Pilates in the comfort of your own house.
Pilates exercises have been designed to work the muscles of the body as efficiently as possible in minimum time. You do not have to spend hours every day in the gym. All you need is to practice two or three times a week. You can start with 10 minute sessions and gradually lengthen their duration.
You can practice Pilates at any time of the day. Some people prefer to exercise first thing in the morning, while others like to work out during the day or in the evening. Whatever you decide, the most important thing is to do it regularly and if you want to see steady results, you should aim for 15-minute sessions at least four times a week.
The exercises can help achieve better balance, muscle coordination, as well as increased stamina and flexibility. The aim of Pilates is to work different muscles to tone and condition the body, while developing correct breathing, good posture, and mental concentration and focus. The carefully designed exercises will help you to reduce stress and beat fatigue, as well as build up your self-confidence and heighten your sense of well-being. Although this book is not intended to be a substitute for exercising with a qualified Pilates instructor, it does show how to practice some of the basic Pilates exercises. The sequence of color photographs detailing all the postures of every single exercise is well done and as a result the reader feels compelled to actually do the exercises on his own.
One of the main differences between Pilates and many other forms of exercise is that it uses the power of the mind to help with the physical exercises. This mind-body approach has opened up a new realm of possibilities to create a framework for exercise that is harmonious, balanced and focused.
The second section introduces yoga which is an easy, undemanding and enjoyable way of becoming healthier and stronger. In addition, it can have a beneficial effect on a variety of medical conditions, such as high blood pressure. Recent scientific studies have shown that the regular practice of yoga decreases problems with breathing, digestion, and blood pressure, eliminates stress and tension, and helps people suffering with arthritis and arteriosclerosis.
There are many forms of yoga but the most popular one is hatha yoga, which concentrates on the physical body. It teaches us that gaining control over the body is the key to controlling the mind. The standing postures, for example, teach us how to stand with presence and self-assurance and how to remain centered in the moment. One of these postures is the Triangle Pose that involves an intense stretch all along the side of the body from your feet to the tips of the fingers. This movement tones the spinal nerves and the abdominal organs; it also improves the digestion, stimulates circulation and reduces pain in the lower back.
The Standing Forward Bend is another excellent pose invigorates the nervous system and takes nourishing blood to the brain; it also stretches the muscles at the back of the legs and lengthens the spine, improving suppleness and elasticity as well as toning the muscles on the back of the body.
The last section of the book offers practical advice to help overcome the pressures of modern life and it shows simple but effective ways of making relaxation an integral part of your everyday life. Relaxation can be defined as a set of easily acquired skills that will teach you how to fight the effects of stress and restore the balance between body and mind.
Breathing is the fastest and most efficient way to calm the mind and body. Stress is the cause of shallow breathing because when stress levels arise, we tend to use only the top third of the lungs. There is a drop in levels of carbon dioxide, which is needed to maintain blood acidity so that harmful toxins are not breathed out. This has a direct impact on the nerves and muscles, and may cause tiredness, palpitations and panic attacks. If you learn to breathe properly, you can benefit from a lower heart-rate, reduced blood pressure. Deeper breathing and a slower pulse are signs of good health. The deeper the breath, the more body tissues can be oxygenated and the stronger your heart is, the less often it needs to beat.
Visualization is a technique which uses the imagination to tackle stress. Through imagining landscapes, sounds and smells, you can use positive thinking to feel relaxed. Visualizing a deserted sandy beach with the soft sound of the waves and the gentle breeze and soaking up the atmosphere helps you feel truly relaxed.
Laughing not only makes you feel good but it is also good for your health. It lowers blood pressure, relaxes muscles, reduces pain, reduces stress hormones and triggers the release of endorphins, the body’s natural painkiller, and produces a general sense of well-being.
In order to stay relaxed you also have to accept that you are the only one who can control your actions. Fighting to control the world around you is an impossible task. Once you accept that life is full of obstacles, they become easier to deal with. You need to live “carpe diem” that is enjoying the pleasures of the moment without concern for the future. Small children have a wonderful ability to live in the moment because they are free of the burden of the past and have not yet learned how to fear the future. As adults we are so conditioned to think of a hundred things at once that we often find it difficult to break free.
Competition and striving for material success cause much of the stress in our society, and it is all too easy to forget the truly important things in our life. We have to take a few moments each day to think carefully about all the good things we have.
And finally, a good night’s sleep is the best way to recover from illness or cope with stress. When sleeping, your body will repair and regenerate itself, and your mind can resolve outstanding problems through dreams. However, the amount of sleep necessary for each individual to feel rested varies for each individual, and it decreases with age. Adults get by on seven to eight hours sleep and the elderly can function on five or six hours a night.
This book is a practical guide to relaxation techniques. When you find ways to look after yourself, you realize that it takes in fact very little efforts to be happy and relaxed. The introduction to Pilates and yoga are particularly good. Each of these sections is accompanied with excellent photographs and captions showing and explaining how to perform each movement in a clear manner. After looking at the detailed sequence of each exercise, the reader is motivated to try and reproduce it on his own.
The New Guide To Relaxation helps us not only master the art of living in harmony with ourselves but it also reminds us that relaxation is the most important key to health and well being.

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Myanmar junta seeks international cooperation over COVID-19 crisis

Myanmar junta seeks international cooperation over COVID-19 crisis
Updated 18 sec ago

Myanmar junta seeks international cooperation over COVID-19 crisis

Myanmar junta seeks international cooperation over COVID-19 crisis
  • Junta leader says COVID-19 vaccinations needed to be increased
  • Efforts to tackle the outbreak have been further hampered by some of the worst flooding in years in eastern Myanmar

Myanmar’s military ruler is looking for greater cooperation with the international community to contain the coronavirus, state media reported on Wednesday, as the Southeast Asian country struggles with a surging wave of infections.
Senior General Min Aung Hlaing called in a speech for more cooperation on prevention, control and treatment of COVID-19, including with fellow members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and “friendly countries,” the Global New Light of Myanmar reported.
The junta leader said vaccinations needed to be increased, through both donated doses and by developing domestic production, aided by Russia, the newspaper said, adding Myanmar would seek the release of funds from an ASEAN COVID-19 fund.
Myanmar recently received two million more Chinese vaccines, but it was believed to have only vaccinated about 3.2 percent of its population, according to a Reuters tracker.
There have been desperate efforts by people to find oxygen in many parts of the country. The Myanmar Now news portal, citing witnesses, reported that at least eight people died in a Yangon hospital at the weekend after a piped oxygen system failed.
Reuters could not independently confirm the report and the North Okkalapa General Hospital and a health ministry spokeswoman could not immediately be reached for comment.
Infections in Myanmar have surged since June, with 4,964 cases and 338 deaths reported on Tuesday, according to health ministry data cited in media. Medics and funeral services put the toll much higher.
Myanmar has been in chaos since the military ousted an elected government led by Aung San Suu Kyi on Feb. 1, with regular protests and fighting between the army and newly formed militias.
Last week, prisoners in Yangon staged a protest over what activists said was a major COVID-19 outbreak in the colonial-era Insein jail, where many pro-democracy protesters are being held.
Efforts to tackle the outbreak have been further hampered by some of the worst flooding in years in eastern Myanmar.
The military has appeared wary of outside help in past disasters, particularly if it believes strings are attached, forcing Myanmar’s people to help each other, though a previous junta did allow in aid via ASEAN after the devastating cyclone Nargis in 2008.
Despite Min Aung Hlaing agreeing to an ASEAN peace plan reached in April, the military has shown little sign of following through on it and has instead reiterated its own, entirely different plan to restore order and democracy.
The military justified its coup by accusing Suu Kyi’s party of manipulating votes in a November general election to secure a landslide victory. The electoral commission at the time and outside observers rejected the complaints.
But in a further sign of the junta’s tightening grip on power, the military-appointed election commission this week officially annulled the November results, saying the vote was not in line with the constitution and electoral laws, and was not “free and fair,” army-run MRTV network reported.


A birthday gift: Israeli woman donates kidney to Gaza boy

A birthday gift: Israeli woman donates kidney to Gaza boy
Updated 40 min 46 sec ago

A birthday gift: Israeli woman donates kidney to Gaza boy

A birthday gift: Israeli woman donates kidney to Gaza boy
  • ‘You don’t know me, but soon we’ll be very close because my kidney will be in your body’

ESHHAR, Israel: Idit Harel Segal was turning 50, and she had chosen a gift: She was going to give one of her own kidneys to a stranger.
The kindergarten teacher from northern Israel, a proud Israeli, hoped her choice would set an example of generosity in a land of perpetual conflict. She was spurred by memories of her late grandfather, a Holocaust survivor, who told her to live meaningfully, and by Jewish tradition, which holds that there’s no higher duty than saving a life.
So Segal contacted a group that links donors and recipients, launching a nine-month process to transfer her kidney to someone who needed one.
That someone turned out to be a 3-year-old Palestinian boy from the Gaza Strip.
“You don’t know me, but soon we’ll be very close because my kidney will be in your body,” Segal wrote in Hebrew to the boy, whose family asked not to be named due to the sensitivities over cooperating with Israelis. A friend translated the letter into Arabic so the family might understand. “I hope with all my heart that this surgery will succeed and you will live a long and healthy and meaningful life.”
Just after an 11-day war, “I threw away the anger and frustration and see only one thing. I see hope for peace and love,” she wrote. “And if there will be more like us, there won’t be anything to fight over.”
What unfolded over the months between Segal’s decision and the June 16 transplant caused deep rifts in the family. Her husband and the oldest of her three children, a son in his early 20s, opposed the plan. Her father stopped talking to her.
To them, Segal recalled, she was unnecessarily risking her life. The loss of three relatives in Palestinian attacks, including her father’s parents, made it even more difficult.
“My family was really against it. Everyone was against it. My husband, my sister, her husband. And the one who supported me the least was my father,” Segal said during a recent interview in her mountaintop home in Eshhar. “They were afraid.”
When she learned the boy’s identity, she kept the details to herself for months.
“I told no one,” Segal recalled. “I told myself if the reaction to the kidney donation is so harsh, so obviously the fact that a Palestinian boy is getting it will make it even harsher.”
Israel has maintained a tight blockade over Gaza since Hamas, an Islamic militant group that opposes Israel’s existence, seized control of the area in 2007.
The bitter enemies have fought four wars since then, and few Gazans are allowed to enter Israel. With Gaza’s health care system ravaged by years of conflict and the blockade, Israel grants entry permits to small numbers of medical patients in need of serious treatments on humanitarian grounds.
Matnat Chaim, a nongovernmental organization in Jerusalem, coordinated the exchange, said the group’s chief executive, Sharona Sherman.
The case of the Gaza boy was complicated. To speed up the process, his father, who was not a match for his son, was told by the hospital that if he were to donate a kidney to an Israeli recipient, the boy would “immediately go to the top of the list,” Sherman said.
On the same day his son received a new kidney, the father donated one of his own — to a 25-year-old Israeli mother of two.
In some countries, reciprocity is not permitted because it raises the question of whether the donor has been coerced. The whole ethic of organ donation is based on the principle that the donors should give of their own free will and get nothing in return.
In Israel, the father’s donation is seen as an incentive to increase the pool of donors.
For Segal, the gift that had sparked such conflict in her family accomplished more than she hoped. Her kidney has helped save the boy’s life, generated a second donation and established new links between members of perpetually warring groups in one of the world’s most intractable conflicts. She said she visited the boy on the eve of his surgery and maintains contact with his parents.
Segal said she honored her grandfather in a way that helps her cope with the grief of his death five years ago. The donation was an act of autonomy, she said, and she never wavered. And eventually her family came around — a gift, perhaps, in itself.
She said her husband understands better now, as do her children. And on the eve of Segal’s surgery, her father called.
“I don’t remember what he said because he was crying,” Segal said. Then, she told him that her kidney was going to a Palestinian boy.
For a moment, there was silence. And then her father spoke.
“Well,” he said, “he needs life, also.”

Related


Three Armenian soldiers killed in clashes with Azerbaijan

Three Armenian soldiers killed in clashes with Azerbaijan
Updated 53 min 4 sec ago

Three Armenian soldiers killed in clashes with Azerbaijan

Three Armenian soldiers killed in clashes with Azerbaijan
  • In six weeks of fighting last September to November, Azeri troops drove ethnic Armenian forces out of swathes of territory they had controlled since the 1990s

MOSCOW: Three Armenian soldiers were killed in an exchange of gunfire with Azerbaijan forces, Armenia’s defense ministry said on Wednesday.
In six weeks of fighting last September to November, Azeri troops drove ethnic Armenian forces out of swathes of territory they had controlled since the 1990s in and around the Nagorno-Karabakh region, before Russia brokered a cease-fire.


Environmentalists slam All Blacks tie-up with petrochemical firm

Environmentalists slam All Blacks tie-up with petrochemical firm
Updated 43 min 5 sec ago

Environmentalists slam All Blacks tie-up with petrochemical firm

Environmentalists slam All Blacks tie-up with petrochemical firm
  • The tie-up puts the All Blacks into the high-performing Ineos sports stable along with the Mercedes F1 team

WELLINGTON: New Zealand Rugby confirmed a deal Wednesday for petrochemical giant Ineos to sponsor the All Blacks, in an agreement slammed by environmental watchdog Greenpeace.
Ineos has signed a six-year deal which will put its logo on the shorts of the 15- and seven-a-side men’s and women’s All Blacks teams as well as the Maori All Blacks and the New Zealand under-20 side.
The tie-up, reported in local media to be worth NZ$8.0 million ($5.6 million), puts the All Blacks into the high-performing Ineos sports stable along with the Mercedes F1 team, Grenadiers cycling team and Team UK sailing, as well as the Nice and Lausanne-Sport football clubs.
However, Greenpeace campaigner Juressa Lee said it was “gutting” to see New Zealand Rugby sign a sponsorship deal with the oil and gas conglomerate.
“Many of our rugby players are of Maori and Pacific descent, and come from communities which are on the frontline of sea level rise and extreme storm events, and they shouldn’t be expected to wear the brand of a climate polluter like Ineos,” she said.
“We also want to see our people living their dreams donning the black jersey, but now they will carry the Ineos brand, and Ineos is one of the world’s worst oil and plastic polluters.”
Announcing the deal, New Zealand Rugby boss Mark Robinson had said: “We are committed to nurturing the development of rugby over the next six years with Ineos Sport and are looking forward to working alongside some of the best sports teams in the world.
“Ineos will bring an innovative approach and dedication to the partnership with our Teams in Black, qualities we see across all aspects of their business, particularly around sustainability with their commitment to deliver a zero-carbon emission future in line with the Paris Agreement.”
The 2015 Paris climate accord aims to limit temperature rises to “well below” 2.0 Celsius above pre-industrial levels and try to limit them to 1.5C.
All Blacks Captain Sam Whitelock said he welcomed being involved in the Ineos high-performance sport group.
“The All Blacks are looking forward to being part of this performance partnership and learning from some of their incredible sporting partnerships as well,” he said.


After COVID, Saudi Arabia set to turn its attention to an older scourge: viral hepatitis

The WHO says 4.5 million deaths could be prevented in low- and middle-income countries by 2030 through vaccination, testing, medicines and education. (AFP)
The WHO says 4.5 million deaths could be prevented in low- and middle-income countries by 2030 through vaccination, testing, medicines and education. (AFP)
Updated 28 July 2021

After COVID, Saudi Arabia set to turn its attention to an older scourge: viral hepatitis

The WHO says 4.5 million deaths could be prevented in low- and middle-income countries by 2030 through vaccination, testing, medicines and education. (AFP)
  • Ahead of World Hepatitis Day on July 28, health professionals are calling for action against the “silent killer”
  • Dr. Faisal Aba Alkhail of King Faisal Specialist Hospital says the Kingdom will need to resume efforts to eliminate Hepatitis B and C

DUBAI: Before the coronavirus swept the planet in early 2020, Saudi Arabia was on course to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030. But as in the rest of the world, the task of fighting COVID-19 in the Kingdom was understandably given precedence over efforts to defeat what is often called the “silent killer.”

Hepatitis fits the description because 95 percent of infected individuals worldwide are unaware of their infection and in most cases people are asymptomatic. It nevertheless remains the world’s seventh-leading cause of death.
The illness is an inflammation of the liver that can cause a range of health problems and can be fatal, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). There are five main strains of the virus, referred to as types A, B, C, D and E.
While all cause liver disease, the five strains differ in important ways, including modes of transmission, severity of the illness, geographical distribution and prevention methods.

In particular, types B and C lead to chronic disease and, together, are the most common cause of liver cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) and liver cancer. An estimated 325 million people worldwide live with hep-B or C and, for most, testing and treatment remains beyond reach.
In 2015, viral hepatitis caused 1.34 million deaths worldwide, mostly from hep-B infection, which is higher than the number of global deaths caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
Some types of hepatitis are preventable through vaccination. According to the WHO, “an estimated 4.5 million premature deaths could be prevented in low- and middle-income countries by 2030 through vaccination, diagnostic tests, medicines and education campaigns.”
July 28 is World Hepatitis Day. The date was chosen to coincide with the birthday of Nobel prize-winning scientist Dr. Baruch Blumberg, who discovered hep-B virus and developed a diagnostic test and vaccine.

FASTFACT

July28

World Hepatitis Day is observed each year on this date to raise awareness about the virus that causes liver disease and hepatocellular cancer.

With COVID-19 vaccination efforts continuing apace and the pandemic beginning to subside in many parts of the developed world, the fight against viral hepatitis is once again high on Saudi Arabia’s public health agenda.
“The Saudi Ministry of Health instituted a specific program to fight hepatitis C in the country before the pandemic, in accordance with the WHO,” Dr. Faisal Aba Alkhail, a consultant transplant hepatologist at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, told Arab News.


“But then COVID-19 came and disrupted many initiatives. The battle against COVID-19 had to be the priority.”
In 2016, the WHO Global Health Sector Strategy issued a road map for the elimination of viral hepatitis as a public health problem by 2030.
The plan entailed a 90 percent reduction in infections and a 65 percent reduction in mortality by the end of the decade, compared to a 2015 baseline that showed 257 million people living with hepatitis B, 71 million with hepatitis C, and 36.7 million with HIV.
“As Saudi Arabia gains control over COVID-19, it’s time to revisit the initiatives and campaigns to eliminate viral hepatitis B and C with full force to meet the WHO target of elimination by 2030 in our country,” Aba Alkhail said.
Hepatitis B is spread through contact with the blood, semen and other body fluids of an infected individual, but can be prevented through vaccination.
Hepatitis C is also blood-borne, but varies in its severity, in some cases lasting only a few months while at other times developing into a lifelong illness. It is a major cause of liver cancer, with sufferers often requiring liver transplantation. There is currently no vaccine.
In the 1980s, Saudi Arabia had one of the highest rates of hep-B infection in the world, with an estimated 8.3 percent of the population infected.
Then, in 1989, the Kingdom became the first country in the Middle East to launch a hep-B vaccination program, eight years after the first vaccine was approved for use in the US. By 1990, the vaccine was available to all infants from birth and children were routinely vaccinated when they started school.
While the vaccination of children and infants has been associated with a notable decline in the rate of infection in Saudi Arabia, falling to just 1.3 percent according to the Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology, hepatitis remains a major public health risk in the Kingdom, especially among high-risk groups, including those with HIV, drug addictions and those who have undergone blood transfusions.


In 2007, the Saudi Ministry of Health ranked hepatitis the second most common reportable viral disease in the country, with almost 9,000 new cases diagnosed that year alone. Of these, 52 percent had hepatitis B, 32 percent hepatitis C, and 16 percent hepatitis A.
In Saudi Arabia, hepatitis B and C remain a major cause of hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of primary liver cancer, and diseases that require liver transplantation. The infection rate may have dropped, but morbidity and mortality related to the disease have not shown a parallel decline.

 

It’s time to revisit the initiatives and campaigns to eliminate viral hepatitis B and C with full force.

Dr. Faisal Aba Alkhail - Consultant transplant hepatologist at King Faisal Specialist Hospital in Riyadh

Medical experts expect the burden of associated liver diseases to rise in the coming years, owing to aging in infected populations.

Dr. Faisal Aba Alkhail

Saudi Arabia has implemented a number of programs designed to improve diagnosis, including premarital screening for hepatitis B and C and HIV. “In Saudi Arabia you can’t complete marriage documents without doing the test for hep-B and hep-C,” Aba Alkhail said.
“In addition, the Kingdom follows the standard special population screening of dialysis patients, blood bank donors, hospital-based patients and other high-risk groups.”
Crucially, it has also made hepatitis screening and treatments free to all citizens and residents, both Saudi and non-Saudi.
“In Saudi Arabia, we are (trying our best to follow) the WHO targets: To diagnose 90 percent of infections and treat 80 percent of high viral-load patients by 2030, as well as diagnose and treat all infected patients by 2022,” said Aba Alkhail.


“Most known cases have been rated and cured since effective treatments were made available in 2014. Many countries are running out of new hepatitis C patients to treat, according to the World Hepatitis Alliance.
“Saudi Arabia still has the burden of hepatitis C patients that are not yet diagnosed and there is a need for a screening program to detect previously undiagnosed cases.”
Medical professionals set out a list of recommendations in a May 2021 report, titled “Revealing Hepatitis B Virus as a Silent Killer: A Call-to-Action for Saudi Arabia,” published in the Cureus Journal of Medical Science.
“In 2016, hep-B caused 1,700 annual deaths (i.e. five deaths per day) in KSA,” the report said. “Although substantial improvements have been made in hep-B management, a lot remains to be done for hep-B screening and care pathways.
“Considering the current hep-B estimates in KSA, the country is expected to achieve the WHO hep-B 2030 target goals for diagnosis, treatment and mortality by 2051.
“The current scenario in KSA demands the implementation of a structured policy framework to combat and eliminate hep-B.”
The report’s authors said the Kingdom could curb the virus by “establishing a national-level registry, implementing screening campaigns, improving linkage of care between primary care physicians (PCPs) and specialists, and increasing PCP education and awareness.”
However, the report said that in order for these measures to have the desired effect on transmission rates, they must be adhered to consistently and simultaneously throughout the Kingdom.
“We have already come so far since the 1990s. Saudi Arabia had a problem in the past with hepatitis, but the vaccine has greatly improved its prevalence in the Kingdom,” said Aba Alkhail.
“The challenge now is finding the undiagnosed cases and treating them effectively so that we can win this battle.”

 

Twitter: @rebeccaaproctor

 

Decoder

Hepatitis

● The illness is an inflammation of the liver that can cause a range of health problems and can be fatal, according to the World Health Organization. There are five main strains of the virus, referred to as types A, B, C, D and E. ● While all cause liver disease, the five strains differ in important ways, including modes of transmission, severity of the illness, geographical distribution and prevention methods. ● In particular, types B and C lead to chronic disease and, together, are the most common cause of liver cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) and liver cancer.