Work begins on women’s industrial city

Work begins on women’s industrial city
Updated 11 August 2014

Work begins on women’s industrial city

Work begins on women’s industrial city

Work on the first women’s industrial city in the Kingdom is well under way.
The city, poised to cost SR111 million according to data made available to Arab News, will span an area of 500,000 square meters and is located east of Al-Ahsa International Airport.
Saleh Al-Rasheed, director-general of the Saudi Industrial Property Authority (Modon) at the Ministry of Commerce and Industry, revealed that construction work is ongoing on other projects within Al-Ahsa’s industrial endeavors.
“A second industrial city will be completed by the third quarter of 2015,” said Al-Rasheed.
The women’s industrial city will be divided into three sections: a commercial section, which will span 140,000 square meters, an industrial section to be built on an area of 170,000 square meters, and a services area, which will span 120,000 square meters.
The new city aims to attract and accommodate the largest number of industrial projects pioneered by women, making it the first industrial city to accommodate women’s businesses exclusively.
The second industrial city in Al-Ahsa, meanwhile, will span an area of 300 million square meters and will become the first mega city belonging to Modon on Gulf Bay.
The city will be able to accommodate all types of heavy industries and provide hundreds of thousands of job opportunities. The city will mostly cater to manufacturing industries.
Modon is working with Al-Ahsa’s chamber and municipality, who have contributed to formulating the city’s futuristic vision and ambitious plans in designing and establishing distinctive and major developmental projects and investments via the instructional structural scheme of Al-Ahsa, he said.
The design of the industrial city takes into account the privacy of Saudi women and will provide thousands of jobs for Saudi women and trained citizens.
The location of the city (Modon Oasis) was carefully chosen to be close to the cities of Hofuf and Mubarraz to ensure easy access for female employees and workers to the city, Al-Rasheed said.


Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials
Updated 16 January 2021

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials
  • It will go through rigorous testing and several trial stages before it is approved for use by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority

RIYADH: Preclinical studies on the first Saudi vaccine against COVID-19 have been completed.

Professor of epidemiology Dr. Iman Almansour, who heads the team of researchers working on the vaccine at the Institute for Research and Medical Consultations (IRMC), affiliated with Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University (IAU), confirmed to Arab News on Friday that the studies were complete, and said clinical trials would begin as soon as “the proper approvals” had been given.

She did not specify when that is expected to happen.

The Ministry of Education is financing the team’s project. The team’s research paper has been published in the peer-reviewed journal Pharmaceuticals.

The vaccine is given to the body to build protein inside cells, which stimulate the body to produce immunity specific to the S antigen.

Dr. Iman Almansour, professor of epidemiology

According to the published paper, the vaccine has so far proven effective, when used on animals, in eliciting antibodies that will target the virus. “The vaccine is given to the body to build protein inside cells, which stimulate the body to produce immunity specific to the S antigen,” Dr. Almansour explained.

Dr. Turki Almugaiteeb, director of Healthcare and Life Sciences at RPD Innovations, which runs the National Vaccine and Biomanufacturing Center, told Arab News: “There is a great focus on the results of medical research because of the pandemic. Research can play a great role in developing a vaccine that can be adopted and further developed in the future. We can say that the Kingdom has a strong infrastructure, which can help produce and manufacture a national vaccine.”

Both Almugaiteeb and Almansour stressed that the experimental vaccine will need to go through rigorous testing and several trial stages before it is approved for use by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority.

Prof. Nasser Al-Aqeeli, the deputy minister of education for research and innovation, said the ministry supported programs at the Kingdom’s universities with more than SR500 million ($133.3 million) in 2020.