Study suggests fake sweetener link to infant size, obesity

This file photo taken on May 25, 2015 shows a nurse taking the blood pressure of an overweight youth during his acupuncture and exercise treatment at the Aimin (Love the People) Fat Reduction Hospital in the northern port city of Tianjin. (AFP)
Updated 10 May 2016

Study suggests fake sweetener link to infant size, obesity

MIAMI: Pregnant women who drink artificially sweetened beverages may be more likely to have overweight infants than women who do not, a study suggested on Monday.
Researchers found that daily consumption of artificially sweetened beverages was linked to a two-fold higher risk of having an infant who was overweight at age one, compared to women who drank no artificially sweetened beverages at all.
“To our knowledge, we provide the first human evidence that maternal consumption of artificial sweeteners during pregnancy may influence infant BMI,” said the study led by Meghan Azad of the University of Manitoba.
The report, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Pediatrics, was based on self-reported survey data.
Therefore, it stops short of proving any cause and effect, but should encourage more research into the matter, scientists said.
More than 3,000 mothers logged their dietary habits, which were later analyzed by researchers.
Their infants’ body-mass index was measured at one year of age.
Nearly 30 percent of women reported drinking artificially sweetened beverages while pregnant, but the study did not identify which kinds of sweeteners women were consuming.
Researchers said they controlled for potential confounding factors that could play a role in the baby’s weight, such as the infant’s sex, whether or not the mother was overweight, and whether or not the infant was breastfed — and for how long.
The report also found no link between the child’s BMI and the pregnant mother’s self-reported consumption of sugary drinks.
Previous studies on the matter have been carried out with lab animals.
Some research has found that artificial sweeteners may trigger the appetite and lead to weight gain, or may interfere with important gut bacteria and raise the risk of heart problems.
However, data from observational studies is often conflicting, said an accompanying editorial in JAMA Pediatrics by researchers Mark Pereira, of the University of Minnesota and Matthew W. Gillman of Harvard Medical School.


Where We Are Going Today: Knead

Updated 07 December 2019

Where We Are Going Today: Knead

  • Knead isn’t just a cafe — it is also an authentic bakery

Knead is a great option for anyone looking for something new within this growing trend of cafes. Knead isn’t just a cafe — it is also an authentic bakery that offers a wide range of goods to enjoy with an excellent cup of coffee.

Knead is a cozy place that guarantees a fun time with friends, family or even for work. The food is fresh and delicious.

I liked their donuts more than anything. They are freshly baked and have that perfect texture where you feel like you have bitten into a cloud. The flavors are also brilliant; my favorite was the raspberry donut but other flavors such as butterscotch are also popular.

The staff are friendly and accommodating. They are close to each other, which adds extra warmth to the experience because when you visit it feels like stepping into a family gathering.