Saudi woman first swimmer to cross Dubai Creek, Water Canal

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Dr. Mariam Saleh Binladen raises the Saudi flag as she celebrates after completing a 24-kilometer swim across the Dubai Creek and Dubai Canal on March 10, 2017. (Courtesy: Mariam S. Binladen’s Instagram account)
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Dr. Mariam Saleh Binladen swimming across the Dubai Creek and Dubai Canal on March 10, 2017. (Courtesy: Mariam S. Binladen’s Instagram account)
Updated 12 March 2017

Saudi woman first swimmer to cross Dubai Creek, Water Canal

DUBAI: Dr. Mariam Saleh Binladen, a Saudi dentist and humanitarian, set a new record that added to her tally of world records, while crossing the Dubai Creek and the Dubai Water Canal, swimming a total distance of 24 kilometers on Friday.
Under the patronage of Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum, crown prince of Dubai and chairman of the Dubai Sports Council, the special event was held in collaboration with the Dubai Sports Council, the Dubai Maritime City Authority, the Dubai Roads and Transport Authority and the Dubai Police and Marine Rescue.
This event, which is part of Binladen’s continued pledge to support orphaned Syrian refugees, was attended by a delegation from the Dubai Sports Council and other supporting partners, as well as marine safety, rescue and co-ordination teams.
Mariam’s challenging undertaking began at 5 a.m. on Friday, starting from the canal’s Dubai Creek entrance in the Al-Shindagha area of Dubai’s historic district. She achieved the feat at 2.10 p.m., finishing at Al-Ghubaiba Station next to the Four Seasons Hotel. While swimming for 9 hours and 10 minutes, Binladen battled through strong
currents at the entrance and mouth of the canal, while passing through some of Dubai’s most striking tourism sites.
After reaching the finish line, Binladen expressed her gratitude for the huge support that she received, and said, “I want to extend my warmest appreciation and gratitude to Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum for his patronage of the event, and to the team members who worked really hard over the past month to make this great event a memorable success.”
“I would also like to thank all the people who turned up just to cheer and encourage me throughout the day. I am thrilled and delighted to become the first person to complete a 24km swim along the wonderful, yet challenging, Dubai Water Canal,” added Binladen.
“It was a very challenging experience indeed, given that my preparation time was extremely short, barely one month of preparations to make this event happen. So, I am really happy to have completed the swim successfully, which would not have happened without the amazing support of my family, my crew, my trainer, Fiona, the team from DSC and all the other parties that were involved in this event,” she added.
“This event is part of my continued pledge to raise awareness for the plight of thousands of orphaned Syrian refugees who have lost their parents and guardians, and have been uprooted from their homes, and scattered across different parts of the world. I also wanted to motivate more and more women from the Arab World to take on sports and use their talents to achieve the unachievable, knowing that nothing is impossible,” she said.


Australian Open ‘likely’ to be delayed by two weeks

Updated 8 min 54 sec ago

Australian Open ‘likely’ to be delayed by two weeks

  • Australian Open chief Craig Tiley had originally wanted players to start arriving from mid-December
  • But the plan was thrown into doubt by Victoria state Premier Dan Andrews

SYDNEY: The Australian Open will likely be delayed by one to two weeks, officials said Wednesday, as talks continue over staging the tournament in Melbourne, which has only recently emerged from months of coronavirus lockdown.
A delay for a week or two to the first Grand Slam of the year, scheduled to begin on January 18, was now “most likely,” said Martin Pakula, the Sports Minister of the Victoria State government.
“I still think it’s much more likely that it will be a shorter rather than longer delay,” Pakula said.
The “very complex negotiations” were still under way but he remained confident it would go ahead in the early part of 2021.
For eight months, Australia has virtually closed off from the rest of the world, with a blanket ban on non-residents entering the country and citizens strongly advised against all foreign travel.
Australian Open chief Craig Tiley had originally wanted players to start arriving in Australia from mid-December so they could undergo a mandatory 14-day quarantine before playing traditional warm-up events.
But the plan was thrown into doubt by Victoria state Premier Dan Andrews, who reportedly will not allow players to arrive before January, which would make it all but impossible to hold the high-profile ATP Cup and other tournaments the start of the Open.
Still under discussion is whether players will be able to train or compete during quarantine.
It comes as Grand Slam winner Andy Murray called for all players to be vaccinated against Covid-19 when it becomes available.
“I would hope that all the players would be willing to do that for the good of the sport — providing everything has proved to be safe, clinical trials and everything have been done and there are not any significant side-effects,” Murray said.
Twenty-time Grand Slam champion Nadal said it was an unprecedented situation and urged patience from players.
“That is difficult for everyone,” he said at the ATP Finals in London last week.
“We need to be flexible to understand the situation and to find a way to play as many tournaments as possible next year.”