Only Saudi gallery at Art Dubai 2017 boasts unexpected art

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Updated 16 March 2017

Only Saudi gallery at Art Dubai 2017 boasts unexpected art

Art Dubai 2017, the international summit of the arts, has opened with a record-breaking bang with galleries from 43 countries showcasing the best of the global scene.
With 93 galleries representing more than 500 artists, one gallery stands out for many Saudis visiting the region’s largest art fair.
Jeddah’s Athr Gallery is the only gallery from Saudi Arabia present at Art Dubai, and is drawing interest from passersby due to its unique collection.
Founded by Hamza Serafi and Mohammed Hafiz in 2009, Athr represents Middle Eastern and international artists and showcases an exhibition schedule of international and Saudi contemporary art with the aim of promoting cultural dialogue between the Kingdom and the rest of the world.
The gallery is boasting works by a slew of artists, including Sara Abdu, Ahmad Angawi, Dana Awartani, Farah Behbehani, Ayman Yossri Daydban, Hazem Harb, Ahmed Mater, Moath Al-Ofi, Monira Al-Qadiri, Nasser Al-Salem, Muhannad Shono and Ayman Zedani.
But why is the gallery not joined by other Saudi art houses?
“There is criteria that you have to meet to participate in Art Dubai. So you have to have a specific program, you have to have existed for a certain number of years and we just happen to be the only contemporary gallery that meet the criteria,” curator and artist liaison Maryam Bilal told Arab News.
Despite flying the flag for the Kingdom, Bilal insists “it is not just about pushing Saudi art but it is about pushing specific themes that are relevant to what is happening in our world.”
The booth features contemporary Islamic art by Dana Awartani who creates a visual translation of the Arabic alphabet’s 28 letters.
Ayman Yossri Daydban, a Palestinian artist who grew up in Saudi Arabia, is also featured heavily in the gallery’s booth.
“He uses a lot of mental imagery that we are always looking at, whether it is posters or movie scenes; he discusses issues such as identity and censorship,” Bilal said of the mustard-yellow classic Arabic movie posters with ripped out faces.
Kuwaiti artist Monira Al-Qadiri’s otherworldly work also drew interest at the fair.
“She was influenced by her education and upbringing in Japan, which is why you can see a sci-fi, anime influence in her work,” Bilal said.
Qadiri’s work covers an entire wall of the gallery booth, which has been painted purple and is punctured by a line of protruding, alien-like objects.
“These are 3-D printings of drill bits. The artist comes from Kuwait which is obviously an oil dependent country; before that it was a pearl dependent country so she painted the drill bits in iridescent shades which have the same color scope as pearls and is really asking the question, when people look back 300 years from now what will they think these are?”
The fair, including the Athr gallery booth, is open to the public between March 15-18.


Paris exhibition sheds light on the now-departed Jews of Morocco

Updated 25 September 2020

Paris exhibition sheds light on the now-departed Jews of Morocco

  • Co-curator explains extraordinary tale of discovering an image of her then-teenage father in French photographer’s collection of shots from the 1930s

DUBAI: The largest Jewish population that ever existed in the Arab world was in Morocco, which was home to over 250,000 Jews by the 1940s. A free photography exhibition, which runs at the Museum of the Art and History of Judaism (mahJ) in Paris until May next year, offers a rare insight into their lives there.

“Juifs du Maroc” showcases around 60 black-and-white photographs and drawings by the late French photographer and painter Jean Besancenot, who travelled to Morocco several times and became enamored with the culture there.

The images on display were photographed between 1934 and 1937. They are both intimate and a documentary-like portrayal of Morocco’s Jewish community — some of men, women and children posing in elaborate attire against a neutral background, others of people practicing daily activities of baking, brewing, and reading. Overall, the exhibition preserves and presents “a priceless record of rural Jewish communities in Morocco no longer in existence,” according to a statement published by the museum.

Erfoud, Tafilalet Region Rouhama and Sarah Abehassera in Wedding Suits mahJ. (Adagp, Paris, 2020) 

One of the driving forces behind “Juifs du Maroc” is co-curator Hannah Assouline, a French photographer with more than 30 years of experience, who was born in Algeria and resides in Paris. The exhibition is a particularly personal endeavor for Assouline, since one of the photographs on display is of her father, a then-adolescent Rabbi Messaoud Assouline, who came from a destitute family. The story of how she found this valuable photograph is one of coming full circle and an unlikely coincidence.

“I met Jean Besancenot in 1985, when my interest in photography began,” Assouline told Arab News with some translation help from her assistant Paul. “As soon as Besancenot saw me, he immediately knew where I was from. He told me, ‘You come from Tafilalet (a region in southern Morocco) and you are a Jew.’

“I wanted to buy pictures from him, but since I didn’t have enough money I couldn’t buy a lot,” she continued, adding that Besancenot had 2,800 photographs portraying the Jewish world of Morocco. “He showed me more than 100 pictures — all of Jewish people, among them were many girls and young women.”

Goulmima, Tafilalet Region Young Woman in White mahJ. (Adagp, Paris, 2020)

By chance, Assouline came across a snapshot from 1935 of a very young married couple, and noticed that the boy resembled one of her nephews. Intrigued, Assouline purchased the photograph — along with six more as gifts for her siblings — and was eager to show it to her family.

“I went to my parents’ home to show them the pictures on a Friday night, which is Shabbat,” she said. “My father was very religious and didn’t want to see the pictures on Shabbat. When he finally agreed to look at the pictures, he said in Arabic: ‘It’s me!’ He had never seen this picture before — it took him 50 years to see it. He went through exile, war, moved to a new country with a new story and, in the end, he found his picture.”

It turned out that Assouline’s then-13-year-old father — timid and barefoot — was only playing the part of a groom and was photographed in Erfoud, one of the centers of Moroccan Jewish life at a time when the North African country was a French protectorate.

Erfoud, Tafilalet Region Messaoud Assouline (Tinghir, 1922 – Jerusalem, 2007), 13 years old, in Wedding Suit 
Hannah Assouline Collection. (Adagp, Paris, 2020)

The reason why Besancenot was exploring and documenting these closed-off regions was that he was commissioned by the Foreign Ministry and the then newly built Musée de l’Homme in Paris to carry out ethnographical work — through detailed notes, films, and colorful drawings — of traditional Moroccan clothing. In the publicity for the exhibition, the museum notes of the female costumes and adornments that their “repertoire is sometimes common with that of Muslim women.”

The presence of Jewish women dominates Besancenot’s work. Their imposing headpieces and voluminous layering of necklaces, earrings and bracelets was central to their identity, beauty, and in some cases, social status. “In some of the pictures, you’ll see women wearing torn, old clothes but they’re still wearing all their jewelry,” Assouline noted.

“I love the pictures, because Besancenot was a real human,” she said of the photographer’s compositions. “He took pictures without judgment. The pictures are very sensible and he was very close to the sitters. He came often to Morocco to see the people. It was not a one-time shoot – he came day after day to talk with everyone and then he took the pictures. The exhibition is set between 1934 and 1937, but he always came back to Morocco. All his life, he circled around that country.”