Brazil president seeks to calm fears over meat sales, exports

Brazilian President Michel Temer and Angola’s Ambassador Nelson Manuel Cosme eat barbecue in a steak house in Brasilia after a meeting with ambassadors from countries that import Brazilian meat, on Sunday. (AFP)
Updated 20 March 2017

Brazil president seeks to calm fears over meat sales, exports

BRASILIA: Brazil tried to reassure the world Sunday that its huge meat industry poses no threat — with President Michel Temer even inviting ambassadors to a steak dinner — despite allegations that corrupt exporters sold tainted products.
Temer smiled as he invited diplomats to a traditional Brazilian meat restaurant called a churrascaria, saying “if you accept the invitation we will be very happy.” Nineteen of the 33 envoys who met with him accepted the offer. But Temer had the serious mission of calming a scandal threatening the reputation of the world’s biggest beef and poultry exporting nation.
The scare started Friday when police said a two-year probe had found major meat producers bribed health inspectors to certify tainted food as fit for consumption.
At least 30 people have been arrested, with police raiding more than a dozen processing plants and issuing 27 arrest warrants.
A poultry-processing plant run by the multinational BRF group and two meat-processing plants operated by the local Peccin company were shut down, the Agriculture Ministry said.
Brazilian meat is exported to more than 150 countries, with principal markets as far apart as Saudi Arabia, China, Singapore, Japan, Russia, the Netherlands and Italy. Sales in 2016 reached $5.9 billion in poultry and $4.3 billion in beef, according to Brazilian government data.
In his address to the ambassadors, Temer acknowledged that the scandal had generated “major concern.”
But he insisted that the bad meat and faked certificates occurred in only “a very few businesses” and did not represent a wider problem.
Calling Brazil’s inspection system “one of the most respected” in the world, Temer said: “I want to reiterate our confidence in the quality of our products.”
In 2016, 853,000 consignments of animal products were exported, Temer said, yet “just 184 of them were deemed by importers to be in violation.”
Earlier, Luis Eduardo Pacifici Rangel, secretary of agricultural protection, told reporters that there was “no risk for population, neither for exports.”
Brazil is worried the scandal will hurt attempts to negotiate a trade deal between South America’s Mercosur group with the EU.
The EU ambassador to Brazil, Joao Cravinho, tweeted on Sunday that he wanted “complete, urgent clarifications from the agriculture ministry.”
The authorities have not yet detailed where tainted products were found, but say that in some cases carcinogenic substances were used to mask the smell of bad meat.
In addition to the giant BRF firm, which owns the Sadia and Perdigao brands, companies under investigation include JBS, a world leader in meat sales and owner of the Big Frango, Seara Alimentos and Swift brands.
JBS took out a full-page ad in the newspaper O Globo to say that the federal office conducting the investigation had made no mention of health problems stemming from JBS products. The BRF group is running similar ads, saying its products pose no health risk “whatsoever.”


Aramco chief sees demand for oil staying above 100m barrels

Updated 23 January 2020

Aramco chief sees demand for oil staying above 100m barrels

  • A panel on the global energy outlook at the WEF in Davos heard that renewable energy alone would not be able to meet rising demand for power as more people moved into the middle class
  • The panel also heard that coal, not oil, remained the biggest source of carbon emissions

DAVOS: Aramco CEO Amin Nasser said he expected global oil demand to stay above the 100 million barrels threshold as the rise of the global middle class spurred demand for energy.
A panel on the global energy outlook at the World Economic Forum in Davos heard that renewable energy alone would not be able to meet rising demand for power as more people moved into the middle class.
“There will be additional demand and the only way to meet it is if you continue to provide affordable, reliable and viable energy to the rest of the world,” said the Aramco CEO.
“There is good penetration from renewables and electric cars are picking up however you need to consider what is happening in the world. There are still an additional 2 billion people coming. There are currently 3 billion people using biomass, animal dung, kerosene for cooking and there are 1 billion people today without electricity and almost 50 percent of people have never flown in an aeroplane.”
The panel heard that coal, not oil, remained the biggest source of carbon emissions but that the location of many coal-fired power plants in developing Asian economies meant that reducing its impact was a major challenge.
“The number one source of emissions by far is the coal fire power plants – they alone are responsible for one third of emissions,” said International Energy Agency Executive Director Fatih Birol. “But they are in many cases the number one source of electricity generation in low income countries - so this is not a black and white issue.”