Daesh tried to use woman suicide bomber in foiled Pakistan Easter plot: Army

Noreen Leghari, a would-be Daesh female suicide bomber, is seen in a video confession shown during a news conference by Maj. Gen. Asif Ghafoor, director general of Inter Services Public Relations (ISPR), in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, on Monday. (REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood)
Updated 19 April 2017

Daesh tried to use woman suicide bomber in foiled Pakistan Easter plot: Army

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan: A female would-be suicide bomber who had pledged allegiance to the Daesh group had planned to carry out an attack on a church in Lahore on Easter Sunday, a Pakistan military spokesman said Monday.
Noreen Leghari, a second year medical student, is in army custody after being captured during a raid overnight Friday that left four soldiers wounded and her male accomplice dead, army spokesman Major General Asif Ghafoor told reporters.
A filmed confession was later shown to reporters in which Leghari, dressed in a veil, said: “We were provided equipment on April 1, including two suicide vests, four hand grenades and bullets.
“We were told to use these jackets to attack a church on Easter and I was supposed to be used as a suicide bomber.”
Lahore suffered one of Pakistan’s deadliest attacks on Easter Sunday 2016 — a suicide bomb in a park that killed more than 70 people, including many children, and was claimed by the Jamaat ul Ahrar faction of the Pakistani Taliban.
Pakistan has seen a surge in militant attacks this year that have dented optimism after the country appeared to be making strong gains in its decade-and-a-half long war on militancy.
But Ghafoor said that since launching a new nationwide military operation in February, the army had killed some 108 militants while 558 had been captured or surrendered — including Ehsanullah Ehsan, the former spokesman of the Jamaat-ul-Ahrar.
“The former spokesman of Jamaat ul Ahrar and the Pakistani Taliban Ehsanullah Ehsan has surrendered himself to security forces. He’s not the only one. We will share further details in the coming days,” he said. He did not indicate when Ehsan had handed himself in or give any further details.


Japan warns of more rain, mudslide risk in typhoon-hit areas

Updated 6 min 16 sec ago

Japan warns of more rain, mudslide risk in typhoon-hit areas

TOKYO: The Japanese weather agency warned people in Tokyo and northern Nagano that heavy rainfall Tuesday may set off flooding and mudslides, including in areas recovering from a deadly typhoon.
The Japan Meteorological Agency said heavy rain was expected throughout the day, with waves and thunderstorms possible in Tokyo and the potential for flooding and mudslides in parts of Nagano Prefecture, northwest of Tokyo, including Nagano city.
Authorities also cautioned that landslides and flooding were possible even in areas where official warnings hadn’t been issued.
Typhoon Hagibis earlier this month hit northern and central Japan. Nagano, Fukushima and Miyagi were especially hard hit. The government’s disaster management office said as of Monday 70 deaths were attributed to the typhoon and 12 people were missing.
The heavy rains from the typhoon caused rivers to overflow or damage dams in dozens of places.
Farm crops were also seriously damaged, including apples, cabbage and cucumbers. The agricultural damage was estimated to be as high as 70 billion yen ($700 million).
Miyagi prefecture, where as much as 10 centimeters (3.9 inches) of rain was forecast, cautioned residents that typhoon-damaged areas could be vulnerable to rainfall amounts that normally would not be hazardous, prefecture officials said.