Egypt issues new life sentence against Brotherhood guide

This file photo taken on May 9, 2014 shows Egyptian Brotherhood's supreme guide Mohamed Badie during his trial at a police academy in Cairo. An Egyptian court sentenced Badie to life in prison on Monday over "planning violent attacks against the state" in a retrial, judicial officials and a lawyer said. (AFP / Tarek El-Gabass)
Updated 08 May 2017

Egypt issues new life sentence against Brotherhood guide

CAIRO: An Egyptian court sentenced the Muslim Brotherhood’s supreme guide Mohamed Badie to life in prison for “planning violent attacks” in a retrial on Monday, judicial officials and a lawyer said.
Badie was part of a group of 37 people accused of conspiring to stir unrest during protests that followed the July 2013 military-led ouster of Egypt’s former Islamist president Muhammad Mursi, who hailed from the Brotherhood.
The court condemned Badie to a life term along with Mahmoud Ghozlan, a Brotherhood spokesman, and Hossam Abubakr, a member of its guidance bureau, the officials and defense lawyer Abdel Moneim Abdel Maksoud said.
US-Egyptian citizen Mohamed Soltan, his father Salah Soltan and Ahmed Aref, another spokesman for the group, were among 13 defendants sentenced to serve five years behind bars.
Egyptian authorities deported Mohamed Soltan to the United States in May 2015, while his father remains in custody.
The court on Monday acquitted 21 others, including Gehad Haddad, an international spokesman for the Brotherhood.
The retrial came after Egypt’s court of cassation scrapped a 2015 ruling under which Badie and 13 others were condemned to death, and 34 defendants given life terms.
“We will appeal for everyone who was convicted,” Abdel Maksoud told AFP. The court of cassation would have to issue a final ruling in such an appeal.
Badie is being prosecuted in more than 35 trials, according to his lawyers. He received three death sentences in other cases but those rulings have also been scrapped.
The court of cassation has canceled scores of death sentences against Mursi supporters including against the deposed president himself.


Iran says it’s defused 2nd cyberattack in less than a week

Updated 6 min 24 sec ago

Iran says it’s defused 2nd cyberattack in less than a week

  • Iranian minister said the hackers were tracked
  • The country disconnected much of its infrastructure from the Internet after the Stuxnet computer virus

TEHRAN: Iran’s telecommunications minister announced on Sunday that the country has defused a second cyberattack in less than a week, this time “aimed at spying on government intelligence.”
Mohammad Javad Azari Jahromi said in a short Twitter post that the alleged attack was “identified and defused by a cybersecurity shield,” and that the “spying servers were identified and the hackers were also tracked.” He did not elaborate.
Last Wednesday, Jahromi told the official IRNA news agency that a “massive” and “governmental” cyberattack also targeted Iran’s electronic infrastructure. He provided no specifics on the purported attack except to say it was also defused and that a report would be released.
On Tuesday, the minister dismissed reports of hacking operations targeting Iranian banks, including local media reports that accounts of millions of customers of Iranian banks were hacked.
This is not the first time Iran says it has defused a cyberattack, though it has disconnected much of its infrastructure from the Internet after the Stuxnet computer virus, widely believed to be a joint US-Israeli creation, disrupted thousands of Iranian centrifuges in the country’s nuclear sites in the late 2000s.
In June, Washington officials said that US military cyber forces launched a strike against Iranian military computer systems as President Donald Trump backed away from plans for a more conventional military strike in response to Iran’s downing of a US surveillance drone in the strategic Arabian Gulf.
Tensions have escalated between the US and Iran ever since President Donald Trump withdrew America last year from the 2015 nuclear deal with Tehran and began a policy of “maximum pressure.” Iran has since been hit by multiple rounds of sanctions.