When only breakfast is on the menu

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Recipe
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A cream-filled pastry with Turkish cheese and olives.
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Sand heats Turkish coffee.
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Turkish coffee, Turkish delight, or sweets and pomegranate spread are on sale at the counter.
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Turkish tea is served traditional style. (Photos by Huda Bashatah)
Updated 15 May 2017

When only breakfast is on the menu

If you want to enjoy a Turkish breakfast in Jeddah, Gulnar Bakery & Cafe is the place — however, it is only served 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Gulnar Bakery & Cafe is one of the many Turkish-style cafés in Jeddah. Gulnar is located in Al-Naeem District and serves traditional Turkish breakfast and desserts. It is a cozy well-decorated place fit for couples and small families.
Starting with the name of the café and following through with its interior design, and until the very last sip of the black magic aka Turkish coffee, it is all “Turkized.”
Gulnar’s name stems from “Gul,” or flower, and “nar,” or “pomegranate.” Gulnar is the pomegranate flower, also known as the flower of fire.
The cafe offers fresh pomegranate juice that will wash away the dusty, summer heat and will cool your throat. It is also beneficial for your blood. Make sure to drink it quickly before it turns bitter.
The place is full of freshly baked bread scents, which signal a good morning and an accompanying good mood. That is because the cafe presents the most popular Turkish baked products such as sesame ring-shaped bagels stuffed with white cheese, jam, butter, peanut butter or Nutella.
“Börek” are baked filled pastries made of thin flaky dough stuffed with potato, Spanish beef or cheese.
We picked the intercontinental breakfast consisting of red Turkish tea, butter and jam-stuffed Simit, potato Börek, pomegranate salad along with a salmon sandwich and a plate of honey and cream, Turkish cheese and olives.
Turkish coffee gets its name from the country it was created in, but when it comes to breakfast, Turks are definitely tea people. In Gulnar Café, the tea was prepared in the traditional Turkish way. Water for tea is heated in a samawer over charcoal and is left to simmer on the gentle heat until it steeps.
But Turkish coffee is the real story. We all know what it takes to make a cup of Turkish coffee. Normally you would heat it to a point where it just begins to bubble, but under a rolling boil, so it begins to foam up into the neck of the cans before reducing the heat and allowing the foam to die. The process is repeated three or four times before the mixture is poured into a small cup.

However, Gulnar’s coffee is boiled on sand. The sand can be heated using any method, as long as the heat is consistent.
True Turkish coffee is strong, thick, black and best served with a fresh piece of Lokum or baklava, to keep the sweetness to your mouth.
At Gulnar, we had both a priceless piece of heavenly Turkish delight and baklava stuffed with “booza,” Turkish vanilla ice cream with pistachio.
Lokum, or Turkish Delight, is a nougat dessert served with a variety of flavors and fillings, and often topped with powdered sugar. Gulnar serves it with the sweet and sour pomegranate flavor. If you have a sweet tooth, a bite of the chewy delight will make you want to have the jar before you leave the café.
The menu is short and simple, and will leave you with limited options so you can select fast without getting distracted. Breakfast prices are what you would expect from a small restaurant – very reasonable.
Altogether the atmosphere of Gulnar appeals to everyone who is in love with Turkey.

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Kemetic yoga breathes new life into Egyptian tourism

Updated 18 October 2019

Kemetic yoga breathes new life into Egyptian tourism

  • Egyptian temples have wall carvings which play a major role in the development of Kemitic yoga
  • Kemetic yoga is a blend of physical movements, meditation and controlled breathing

CAIRO: Egypt’s Ministry of Tourism has collaborated with CNN to produce and air a short film about Kemetic yoga to highlight wellness tourism in the country.

Kemetic yoga is a blend of physical movements, meditation and controlled breathing.

The three-minute film was shot in Luxor and follows Sarah Wesley, a certified Kemetic yoga instructor.

“The origins of Kemetic yoga started in the land called Kemit and Kemit is the ancient name of Egypt,” Wesley said.

Egyptian temples have wall carvings which play a major role in the development of Kemitic yoga, along with the study and interpretations of hieroglyphic texts on the subject.

Wesley practices yoga mainly at Karnak Temple, which she described as being full of powerful and peaceful energy.

The practice mainly targets people who want to discover more about themselves and those who wish to expand their consciousness.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Breathing is a significant aspect in all forms of yoga but with Kemetic yoga it is enhanced and highlighted. It is also much slower than other forms of yoga.

• This type of yoga is different to others, as it focuses on breathing rather than poses.

“I hope that the future of Kemetic yoga can reach as many people as possible,” Wesley said.

This type of yoga is different to others, as it focuses on breathing rather than poses.

Breathing is a significant aspect in all forms of yoga but with Kemetic yoga it is enhanced and highlighted. It is also much slower than other forms of yoga.

Kemetic yoga is more than imitating the poses of the gods which have remained eternal due to the carvings on the temple walls. It is a philosophy that aims for self-development.

Kemetic yoga aims to showcase a different side of tourism in Egypt. The film, “Yoga in Egypt,” is one aspect of a partnership between CNN and the ministry, which has launched an international tourism campaign. 

The campaign aims to promote tourism in Egypt by showcasing the country in a different light and changing perceptions about it.

Last month the ministry said it was working with social media influencers to promote Egypt as a travel destination, Al-Ahram newspaper reported.