‘US hackers could have framed Russia in poll hack’

In this Feb. 27, 2013 file photo, hands type on a computer keyboard in Los Angeles. (AP)
Updated 04 June 2017

‘US hackers could have framed Russia in poll hack’

MOSCOW: American hackers could have planted false evidence that Russia interfered in the US presidential election, Russian President Vladimir Putin was quoted as saying by NBC News on Saturday.
US intelligence officials have said Russia tried to interfere in the US election by hacking the Democratic Party to sway the vote in favor of Donald Trump, a charge the Kremlin has repeatedly denied.
In an interview with NBC News’ Sunday Night with Megyn Kelly, a preview of which was released to media, Putin said hackers in the United States could have made it look like Russia was behind the hack for political reasons.
“Hackers can be anywhere. They can be in Russia, in Asia ... even in America, Latin America,” Putin said. “They can even be hackers, by the way, in the United States, who very skilfully and professionally, shifted the blame, as we say, on to Russia.”
“Can you imagine something like that? In the midst of a political battle. By some calculations it was convenient for them to release this information, so they released it, citing Russia. Could you imagine something like that? I can.”
Speaking at Russia’s flagship St. Petersburg International Economic Forum on Friday, Putin said the hacking accusations were no more than “harmful gossip” and any evidence cited by US intelligence could easily have been faked.


36 people missing after boat sinks in Congo river: DRC police

Updated 15 September 2019

36 people missing after boat sinks in Congo river: DRC police

  • Seventy-six people survived after the vessel went down overnight on the outskirts of the capital

KINSHASA, Congo: Thirty-six people are missing after a boat sank in the Congo river on the outskirts of Kinshasa, DR Congo police said on Sunday.

The vessel, which was travelling to the capital, went down overnight in Maluku commune, about 100 kilometres (62 miles) from the centre of the city. Seventy-six people survived, police wrote on Twitter.

"The cause of the accident is not yet known," police spokesperson Colonel Pierrot-Rombaut Mwanamputu told AFP. Lake and river transport is widely used in Democratic Republic of Congo as the highway system is poor, but accidents are common, often caused by overloading and the unsafe state of vessels.

The boat involved was called a "baleiniere" or "whaler" - a commonly-used flat-bottomed vessel between 15 to 30 metres (50 to 100 feet) long by two to six metres wide.

In the vast majority of accidents, passengers are not equipped with life jackets and many cannot swim.