Terror list: 59 individuals and 12 Qatari-affiliated entities as listed in the Saudi, UAE, Bahraini, Egyptian statement

Yusuf Qaradawi
Updated 09 June 2017
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Terror list: 59 individuals and 12 Qatari-affiliated entities as listed in the Saudi, UAE, Bahraini, Egyptian statement

JEDDAH: A joint statement by the governments of Saudi Arabia, UAE, Bahrain and Egypt have listed 59 individuals and 12 Qatari-affiliated entities on a combined list of what they described as "terrorist supporters."  

 

The joint statement said that the list was written as a result of "Qatar’s actions in contravention of its commitments include supporting and harboring elements and organizations that threaten the National security of other states." 

 

It added that Doha repeatedly ignored "calls for the fulfillment of its obligations under the Riyadh Agreement of 2013 and its associated Implementation Mechanisms, and in addition the Comprehensive Agreement of 2014"

 

The statement said that the majority of entities sanctioned are "linked to Qatar and are a manifestation of a Qatari government policy of duplicity.  One that calls for combating terrorism, whilst simultaneously overseeing the financing, supporting and harboring a vast array of terrorist groups and terrorist financing networks". 

 

List of designated individuals:

 

1. Khalifa Mohammed Turki al-Subaie - Qatari

2. Abdelmalek Mohammed Yousef Abdel Salam - Jordanian

3. Ashraf Mohammed Yusuf Othman Abdel Salam - Jordanian

4. Ibrahim Eissa Al-Hajji Mohammed Al-Baker - Qatari

5. Abdulaziz bin Khalifa al-Attiyah - Qatari

6. Salem Hassan Khalifa Rashid al-Kuwari - Qatari

7. Abdullah Ghanem Muslim al-Khawar - Qatari

8. Saad bin Saad Mohammed al-Kaabi - Qatari

9. Abdullatif bin Abdullah al-Kuwari - Qatari

10. Mohammed Saeed Bin Helwan al-Sakhtari - Qatari

11. Abdul Rahman bin Omair al-Nuaimi - Qatari

12. Abdul Wahab Mohammed Abdul Rahman al-Hmeikani - Yemeni

13. Khalifa bin Mohammed al-Rabban - Qatari

14. Abdullah Bin Khalid al-Thani - Qatari

15. Abdul Rahim Ahmad al-Haram - Qatari 

16. Hajjaj bin Fahad Hajjaj Mohammed al-Ajmi - Kuwaiti

17. Mubarak Mohammed al-Ajji - Qatari

18. Jaber bin Nasser al-Marri - Qatari

19. Yusuf Abdullah al-Qaradawi - Egyptian

20. Mohammed Jassim al-Sulaiti - Qatari

21. Ali bin Abdullah al-Suwaidi - Qatari

22. Hashem Saleh Abdullah al-Awadhi - Qatari

23. Ali Mohammed Mohammed al-Salabi - Libyan

24. Abdelhakim Belhadj - Libyan

25. Mahdi Harati - Libyan

26. Ismail Muhammad Mohammed al-Salabi - Libyan

27. Al-Sadiq Abdulrahman Ali al-Ghuraini - Libyan

28. Hamad Abdullah Al-Futtais al-Marri - Qatar

29. Mohamed Ahmed Shawky Islambouli - Egyptian

30. Tariq Abdelmagoud Ibrahim al-Zomor - Egyptian

31. Mohamed Abdelmaksoud Mohamed Afifi - Egyptian

32. Mohamed el-Saghir Abdel Rahim Mohamed - Egyptian

33. Wajdi Abdelhamid Mohamed Ghoneim - Egyptian

34. Hassan Ahmed Hassan Mohammed Al Dokki Al Houti - UAE

35. Hakem al-Humaidi al-Mutairi - Saudi / Kuwaiti

36. Abdullah Mohammed Sulaiman al-Moheiseni - Saudi

37. Hamed Abdullah Ahmed al-Ali - Kuwaiti

38. Ayman Ahmed Abdel Ghani Hassanein - Egyptian

39. Assem Abdel-Maged Mohamed Madi - Egyptian

40. Yahya Aqil Salman Aqeel - Egyptian

41. Mohamed Hamada el-Sayed Ibrahim - Egyptian

42. Abdel Rahman Mohamed Shokry Abdel Rahman - Egyptian

43. Hussein Mohamed Reza Ibrahim Youssef - Egyptian

44. Ahmed Abdelhafif Mahmoud Abdelhady - Egyptian

45. Muslim Fouad Tafran - Egyptian

46. Ayman Mahmoud Sadeq Rifat - Egyptian

47. Mohamed Saad Abdel-Naim Ahmed - Egyptian

48. Mohamed Saad Abdel Muttalib Abdo Al-Razaki - Egyptian

49. Ahmed Fouad Ahmed Gad Beltagy - Egyptian

50. Ahmed Ragab Ragab Soliman - Egyptian

51. Karim Mohamed Mohamed Abdel Aziz - Egyptian

52. Ali Zaki Mohammed Ali - Egyptian

53. Naji Ibrahim Ezzouli - Egyptian

54. Shehata Fathi Hafez Mohammed Suleiman - Egyptian

55. Muhammad Muharram Fahmi Abu Zeid - Egyptian

56. Amr Abdel Nasser Abdelhak Abdel-Barry - Egyptian

57. Ali Hassan Ibrahim Abdel-Zaher - Egyptian

58. Murtada Majeed al-Sindi - Bahraini

59. Ahmed Al-Hassan al-Daski - Bahraini

 

List of entities:

 

1. Qatar Volunteer Center - Qatar

2. Doha Apple Company (Internet and Technology Support Company) - Qatar

3. Qatar Charity - Qatar

4. Sheikh Eid al-Thani Charity Foundation (Eid Charity) - Qatar

5. Sheikh Thani Bin Abdullah Foundation for Humanitarian Services - Qatar

6. Saraya Defend Benghazi - Libya

7. Saraya al-Ashtar - Bahrain

8. February 14 Coalition - Bahrain

9. The Resistance Brigades - Bahrain

10. Hezbollah Bahrain - Bahrain

11. Saraya al-Mukhtar - Bahrain

12. Harakat Ahrar Bahrain - Bahrain Movement

 


In Syria’s Idlib, education a casualty of war

A displaced Syrian girl carries books on her head near a bus converted into a classroom in the village of Hazano in northwestern Syria. (AFP)
Updated 21 September 2019

In Syria’s Idlib, education a casualty of war

  • The conditions are dire however, with camp manager Hammud Al-Sayah explaining initial planning was done for 50 children, yet attendees now top 375

HAZANO, SYRIA: Near the village of Hazano in northwestern Syria, children come running through the olive groves every morning to meet the bus that brings school to their improvised tented camp.
Years of fighting and displacement in Idlib province have wrought chaos for the education of children, destroying schools and scattering families into homelessness across the countryside.
More than 400,000 people have been displaced since April alone, when the Russian-backed regime upped its deadly bombardment of the opposition-dominated enclave.
“These children can’t go to school, it’s too far from where they are,” said Farid Bakir, a local program manager with Syria Relief, the charity that launched the bus project.
In Hazano camp, the children get in line and hope to be among those who squeeze into the bus for a few hours.
A whiteboard is installed in the back, a thick carpet laid on the floor and a few dozen small desks, also used as chairs, are rearranged depending on the activity.
The ceiling is too low for the teacher to stand fully upright but Hussein Ali Azkour, a young boy wearing a yellow T-shirt, is enthusiastic about his classroom-on-wheels.
“The difference between a normal school and the bus, is that the bus is air-conditioned. It’s better than a thousand schools,” he said.
“When we fled here, there was no school and they started bringing the buses. If these buses were to stop coming, we would have no education and learn nothing.”
The buses cater only for ages ranging from five to 12 and include classes in Arabic, mathematics, science and sometimes English, as well as singing and drawing.
Since the project was launched in May, around 1,000 children have benefitted from the bus program, Bakir said.
That is a drop in the ocean of problems children, who represent more than half of the Idlib region’s 3 million inhabitants, are facing. According to Save the Children, the heavy bombardment since late April has damaged or otherwise impacted 87 educational facilities, while a further 200 are being used as shelters for those the violence displaced.
The UK-based NGO says some parents have been pleading with them to shut down schools for fear they would be targeted in regime air strikes.
“As the new school year starts, the remaining functional schools can only accommodate up to 300,000 of the 650,000 school-age children,” it said.
Ragheb Hassoun’s children are among the few who have been fortunate enough to receive a few hours a week of lessons through the bus project, but he says the situation is not tenable.
“We want something permanent — a school on the land where we live,” the 28-year-old said.
He and his family have been displaced several times since the start of the conflict in Syria eight years ago.

NUMBER 300K

schoolchildren out of the 650,000 can be accommodated in the remaining functional schools as the new school year starts, according to Save the Children.

Hassoun said he would be happy if his children could at least go to school during normal hours in a tent at the camp.
This is what children have in a larger camp near Dana, north of the city of Idlib, where the local school is housed under two large UN tents.
The conditions are dire however, with camp manager Hammud Al-Sayah explaining initial planning was done for 50 children, yet attendees now top 375.
Books underarm — or with bags strapped to backs — pupils are squeezed around black desks, while those unable to find a seat perch cross-legged on the floor.
Children who are four or five years apart attend the same classes.
“The pressure is huge,” Sayah said, admitting that the schooling conditions have a serious impact on the quality of education.
At 10 years of age, Abdel Razaq knows that his education is being compromised.
Standing in front of the white tent he has come to call his school, he said he dreams of a big building “where the number of children in each class is lower.”
“And where we could sit comfortably and hear what the teachers are saying.”